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Book recommendations?
posted in Off Topic
1
#1
0 Frags +

reading is helping me get my brain wrinkles back

reading is helping me get my brain wrinkles back
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#2
60 Frags +

if anyone says harry potter i will shoot you

if anyone says harry potter i will shoot you
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#3
1 Frags +

I've been going through The Mushroom at the End of the World by Anna L. Tsing for my book club and it's good if you like anthropology, albeit it is a bit academic at times

I've been going through [i]The Mushroom at the End of the World[/i] by Anna L. Tsing for my book club and it's good if you like anthropology, albeit it is a bit academic at times
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#4
2 Frags +

my fav thing i read recently was the overstory by richard powers
its very slow so its probably not for everyone but i fucking loved it

im not sure about how hard the uk forces you to read to kill a mockingbird but if you havent read it you should
its genuinely really really good if ur not forced to read it aa billion times in school

dune is nice if you like political intrigue and sci-fi
its mostly about the dialogue and people fucking eachother over and beign the biggest brain so if u like that kinda shit with an edgy 15 yearold super smart protag dune is really cool

my fav thing i read recently was the overstory by richard powers
its very slow so its probably not for everyone but i fucking loved it

im not sure about how hard the uk forces you to read to kill a mockingbird but if you havent read it you should
its genuinely really really good if ur not forced to read it aa billion times in school

dune is nice if you like political intrigue and sci-fi
its mostly about the dialogue and people fucking eachother over and beign the biggest brain so if u like that kinda shit with an edgy 15 yearold super smart protag dune is really cool
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#5
2 Frags +

Vampyroteuthis Infernalis: A Treatise, with a Report by the Institut Scientifique de Recherche Paranaturaliste
by villem flusser and louis bec

i read it as part of one of my modules at uni but ended up really liking it and its piqued my interest for posthumanities, really good read if you like that sort of stuff

Vampyroteuthis Infernalis: A Treatise, with a Report by the Institut Scientifique de Recherche Paranaturaliste
by villem flusser and louis bec

i read it as part of one of my modules at uni but ended up really liking it and its piqued my interest for posthumanities, really good read if you like that sort of stuff
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#6
2 Frags +

Meditations by Marcus Aurelius is always a go-to recommendation.

I'm reading "The Color Purple" right now. Other good books to read given the current events of the world are "Heart of Darkness" and "Things Fall Apart." I'm also a big fan of "Catch-22."

For history books, I enjoyed both "Why Nations Fail" and "The Invention of Russia - The Rise of Putin and the Age of Fake News."

All of the other choices in this thread so far look really good.

Meditations by Marcus Aurelius is always a go-to recommendation.

I'm reading "The Color Purple" right now. Other good books to read given the current events of the world are "Heart of Darkness" and "Things Fall Apart." I'm also a big fan of "Catch-22."

For history books, I enjoyed both "Why Nations Fail" and "The Invention of Russia - The Rise of Putin and the Age of Fake News."

All of the other choices in this thread so far look really good.
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#7
2 Frags +

One Hundred Years of Solitude; GGM
Nada; Carmen Laforet
The Shadow of the Wind; Carlos Ruiz Zafón

[i]One Hundred Years of Solitude[/i]; GGM
[i]Nada[/i]; Carmen Laforet
[i]The Shadow of the Wind[/i]; Carlos Ruiz Zafón
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#8
2 Frags +

I've been reading Iain Bank's the culture series recently and it's p good. There are 10 books though so some of them are better and some are worse ofc.

Robert Jordan's wheel of time series is also OK, it's like 14 books too so there are good and bad books here as well. I think i've read up to book 9 and the books are good at least until then.

James Clavell's asian saga is very good series too, the chronologically first book, shogun, is probably one of my favourite books.

If you are looking for non-fiction i can recommend Max Tegmark's book on AI, although it is pretty technical.

Haruki Murakami's book about running is interesting and quite motivating.

I also read a really good book about ancient languages by Ola Wikander not too long ago but i don't think it's translated to english. The book was easy and fun to read despite difficult language stuff so if you find books by him they might be good.

I've been reading Iain Bank's the culture series recently and it's p good. There are 10 books though so some of them are better and some are worse ofc.

Robert Jordan's wheel of time series is also OK, it's like 14 books too so there are good and bad books here as well. I think i've read up to book 9 and the books are good at least until then.

James Clavell's asian saga is very good series too, the chronologically first book, shogun, is probably one of my favourite books.

If you are looking for non-fiction i can recommend Max Tegmark's book on AI, although it is pretty technical.

Haruki Murakami's book about running is interesting and quite motivating.

I also read a really good book about ancient languages by Ola Wikander not too long ago but i don't think it's translated to english. The book was easy and fun to read despite difficult language stuff so if you find books by him they might be good.
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#9
4 Frags +

The Stranger by Albert Camus is a beautifully written work of philosophical fiction. It's fairly short and not at all verbally dense. Great weekend read if you ask me.

[i]The Stranger[/i] by Albert Camus is a beautifully written work of philosophical fiction. It's fairly short and not at all verbally dense. Great weekend read if you ask me.
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#10
3 Frags +

If you're willing to put up with the length, Brandon Sanderson is always good. I'd recommend The Final Empire to start with, but he's got so many series you're spoilt for choice really

If you're willing to put up with the length, Brandon Sanderson is always good. I'd recommend The Final Empire to start with, but he's got so many series you're spoilt for choice really
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#11
4 Frags +

If you want some more bizarre fiction most of the stuff by Douglas Adams is really good.

If you haven't yet, the Dune series 100%, as well as the Foundation series by Asimov. Both are keystones when it comes to science fiction.

I also really enjoyed Gormenghast, but it can be a heavy read.

If you want some more philosophical shit, a lot of the short stories by Borges are also really really good and thought provoking. That being said most of them need to be re-read like 3 or 4 times before you understand what the fuck is going on. Still recommend though.

Will edit more in when I get home and look at my bookshelf.

If you want some more bizarre fiction most of the stuff by Douglas Adams is really good.

If you haven't yet, the Dune series 100%, as well as the Foundation series by Asimov. Both are keystones when it comes to science fiction.


I also really enjoyed Gormenghast, but it can be a heavy read.

If you want some more philosophical shit, a lot of the short stories by Borges are also really really good and thought provoking. That being said most of them need to be re-read like 3 or 4 times before you understand what the fuck is going on. Still recommend though.


Will edit more in when I get home and look at my bookshelf.
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#12
Stream Highlights
1 Frags +

The entirety of the Foundation series by Asimov

The entirety of the Foundation series by Asimov
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#13
1 Frags +

are you looking for fiction or non-fiction?

are you looking for fiction or non-fiction?
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#14
2 Frags +

I second Brandon Sanderson, I lovedddd Mistborn. It's really really really well done fantasy, probably my favorite series.
Also second Wheel Of Time, if you get invested into it they can be a really fun time sink. I love how their main author died and another one had to take his place, anything Brandon Sanderson touches is really good tbh.

The Southern Reach Trilogy is a really good existential thriller kinda thing? I got sucked into that. They made a movie about it but you can't really have something so existential in a visual format. I read that during high school and I would legit skip class to read it.
Three body problem was also really trippy but I got kinda caught up by youtube so I haven't finished book two :/

I second Brandon Sanderson, I lovedddd Mistborn. It's really really really well done fantasy, probably my favorite series.
Also second Wheel Of Time, if you get invested into it they can be a really fun time sink. I love how their main author died and another one had to take his place, anything Brandon Sanderson touches is really good tbh.

The Southern Reach Trilogy is a really good existential thriller kinda thing? I got sucked into that. They made a movie about it but you can't really have something so existential in a visual format. I read that during high school and I would legit skip class to read it.
Three body problem was also really trippy but I got kinda caught up by youtube so I haven't finished book two :/
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#15
1 Frags +
Tino_... the Foundation series by Asimov. ...TailorTFThe entirety of the Foundation series by Asimov

I see people recommending the foundation books a lot and while i agree that it is a true sci-fi classic i think that the robot novels (caves of steel, etc) are much more interesting.
Not saying that the foundation books are bad though, just that imo there are better books in Isaac Asimov's foundation universe (unless robot novels + empire novels + prequels/sequels are included in this definition of the foundation series).

[quote=Tino_]... the Foundation series by Asimov. ...[/quote]
[quote=TailorTF]The entirety of the Foundation series by Asimov[/quote]
I see people recommending the foundation books a lot and while i agree that it is a true sci-fi classic i think that the robot novels (caves of steel, etc) are much more interesting.
Not saying that the foundation books are bad though, just that imo there are better books in Isaac Asimov's foundation universe (unless robot novels + empire novels + prequels/sequels are included in this definition of the foundation series).
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#16
1 Frags +
Wandumthe overstory by richard powers
dune is nice if you like political intrigue and sci-fi

+1 for Good taste. U an eco person?

More science fiction-ish recommendations:
1. The Broken Earth Trilogy! (I've read the first two. Both were insanely good.)
2. U.K. Le Guins science fiction!
3. The Windup Girl!
4. I like Neal Stephenson's books, but some are maybe a bit much.

Personally didn't like the Foundation trilogy too much? I read them off-and-on over the course of like 2 years though.

[quote=Wandum]the overstory by richard powers
dune is nice if you like political intrigue and sci-fi[/quote]
+1 for Good taste. U an eco person?

More science fiction-ish recommendations:
1. The Broken Earth Trilogy! (I've read the first two. Both were insanely good.)
2. U.K. Le Guins science fiction!
3. The Windup Girl!
4. I like Neal Stephenson's books, but some are maybe a bit much.

Personally didn't like the Foundation trilogy too much? I read them off-and-on over the course of like 2 years though.
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#17
2 Frags +
SnackThe Stranger by Albert Camus is a beautifully written work of philosophical fiction. It's fairly short and not at all verbally dense. Great weekend read if you ask me.

If you like The Stranger, The Plague is also pretty good and very topical in our current circumstances

[quote=Snack][i]The Stranger[/i] by Albert Camus is a beautifully written work of philosophical fiction. It's fairly short and not at all verbally dense. Great weekend read if you ask me.[/quote]
If you like The Stranger, The Plague is also pretty good and very topical in our current circumstances
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#18
-1 Frags +

.

.
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#19
newbie.tf
4 Frags +

#nojudgementpls

almost done with the rise of kyoshi book that is the prequel to the avatar series and i have been shocked at how good it is. recently rewatched the series and it's honestly just such a cool universe that they've built up

#nojudgementpls

almost done with the rise of kyoshi book that is the prequel to the avatar series and i have been shocked at how good it is. recently rewatched the series and it's honestly just such a cool universe that they've built up
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#20
-1 Frags +

Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion

The 48 Laws of Power

The Art of War by Sun Tzu

my recent 3

Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion

The 48 Laws of Power

The Art of War by Sun Tzu

my recent 3
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#21
0 Frags +

hadji murad

hadji murad
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#22
1 Frags +

1. No longer human by Osamu Dazai
2. I Am a Strange Loop by Douglas Hofstadter
3. The Mysterious Stranger by Mark Twain.

I'm trying to finish up the latter, and it's probably my favourite of Twains.

1. No longer human by Osamu Dazai
2. I Am a Strange Loop by Douglas Hofstadter
3. The Mysterious Stranger by Mark Twain.

I'm trying to finish up the latter, and it's probably my favourite of Twains.
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#23
0 Frags +

+1 for Iain M. Banks culture series if u like scifi
House of Leaves by MZD
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

+1 for Iain M. Banks culture series if u like scifi
House of Leaves by MZD
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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#24
0 Frags +

I know it’s seen as a bit of a meme but I honestly really liked ‘Can’t Hurt Me’ by David Goggins.

I know it’s seen as a bit of a meme but I honestly really liked ‘Can’t Hurt Me’ by David Goggins.
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#25
2 Frags +

The Inheritance Cycle is a pretty good book series if you like fantasy movies like Lord of the Rings

The Inheritance Cycle is a pretty good book series if you like fantasy movies like Lord of the Rings
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#26
1 Frags +

I recommend slobberknocker and it’s sequel “the man in the black hat” by Jim Ross, that is if you’re into professional wrestling!

I recommend slobberknocker and it’s sequel “the man in the black hat” by Jim Ross, that is if you’re into professional wrestling!
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#27
3 Frags +

+1 for Sanderson. Personally I started with Stormlight and I believe it's his best work, but a lot of people will recommend you begin with either Mistborn or one of his "standalone" novels Elantris or Warbreakers (think he will eventually make sequels to these, additionally they aren't really standalone anyway as most of his books are connected through what he calls the "cosmere", sharing a universe/magic systems/rarely characters).

One of Sanderson's strong points is that he makes these really well though out, creative, and just cool magic systems. In Mistborn you consume metal, metabolizing it in order to achieve various effects such as emotional control, the ability to push and pull oneself around, etc (its cooler when he explains it).

Sanderson is also really good at world building and plotting out/pacing his stories. I believe his fans have coined how he ends his stories with multiple story lines converging as the "Sanderson Avalanche".

His biggest weakness that he himself admits is definitely his prose.There are definitely times when characters/descriptions feel kind of bland I guess. A lot of people also do not like how he writes female povs/romance.

Also if you care, his novels while definitely targeted towards adults, can be kind of prudish? There is violence, killing, references to rape, but Sanderson is a Mormon, and the lack of any mention of sex, even in passing, even only hinted at, can be absent in some of his books (Mistborn/Stormlight). Not saying there should be GRRM sex scenes, but the lack of sexuality in his books is very apparent, so if you want to coom beware.

+1 for Sanderson. Personally I started with Stormlight and I believe it's his best work, but a lot of people will recommend you begin with either Mistborn or one of his "standalone" novels Elantris or Warbreakers (think he will eventually make sequels to these, additionally they aren't really standalone anyway as most of his books are connected through what he calls the "cosmere", sharing a universe/magic systems/rarely characters).

One of Sanderson's strong points is that he makes these really well though out, creative, and just cool magic systems. In Mistborn you consume metal, metabolizing it in order to achieve various effects such as emotional control, the ability to push and pull oneself around, etc (its cooler when he explains it).

Sanderson is also really good at world building and plotting out/pacing his stories. I believe his fans have coined how he ends his stories with multiple story lines converging as the "Sanderson Avalanche".

His biggest weakness that he himself admits is definitely his prose.There are definitely times when characters/descriptions feel kind of bland I guess. A lot of people also do not like how he writes female povs/romance.

Also if you care, his novels while definitely targeted towards adults, can be kind of prudish? There is violence, killing, references to rape, but Sanderson is a Mormon, and the lack of any mention of sex, even in passing, even only hinted at, can be absent in some of his books (Mistborn/Stormlight). Not saying there should be GRRM sex scenes, but the lack of sexuality in his books is very apparent, so if you want to coom beware.
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#28
0 Frags +

Breakfast of champions

Breakfast of champions
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#29
2 Frags +

If you're new to literature then Walden, The Stranger, Clockwork Orange, Iliad & Odyssey, and The Metamorphosis are good entry-level books
Anything by Nabokov is good
If you have some patience and really like prose, Moby-Dick is fantastic and my favorite book
Anything by Shakespeare is good as well, but takes some practice to get into the flow

If you're new to literature then Walden, The Stranger, Clockwork Orange, Iliad & Odyssey, and The Metamorphosis are good entry-level books
Anything by Nabokov is good
If you have some patience and really like prose, Moby-Dick is fantastic and my favorite book
Anything by Shakespeare is good as well, but takes some practice to get into the flow
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#30
RGL.gg
3 Frags +

I'm gonna also recommend Brandon Sanderson, at least for Stormlight Archive, but with a warning. Those books are dense af and can make reading them feel like a chore cuz he just puts in so god damn much that you barely remember character names, places, or how tf this character relates. Also ALL the inter chapter portions are relevant and you need to remember their names too because they get mentioned. After a certain point its just too much and detracts from the whole experience.

For someone who is like Brando Sando, but idk, "lighter"(?) I'd highly recommend Brian McClellan's Powder Mage Trilogy. He was a student of Brander Sander so Brian is also quality. I prefer Brian over Brandon though because he has the same amount going on (or you're told going on) while being much more streamlined.

Also if we're talking about great fantasy authors and great fantasy works, you have to bring up "Name of the Wind" by Patrick Rothfuss. While the sequel isn't as good and I'm not in a huge rush to reread Name of the Wind, I would still strongly recommend reading it. It's considered one of the greatest modern fantasy works for a reason.

For non-fantasy, Sapiens is amazing and I'm enjoying every page of it. Provides an interesting perspective of the pre-ancient civilizations that is just fascinating to me.

I'm gonna also recommend Brandon Sanderson, at least for Stormlight Archive, but with a warning. Those books are dense af and can make reading them feel like a chore cuz he just puts in so god damn much that you barely remember character names, places, or how tf this character relates. Also ALL the inter chapter portions are relevant and you need to remember their names too because they get mentioned. After a certain point its just too much and detracts from the whole experience.

For someone who is like Brando Sando, but idk, "lighter"(?) I'd highly recommend Brian McClellan's Powder Mage Trilogy. He was a student of Brander Sander so Brian is also quality. I prefer Brian over Brandon though because he has the same amount going on (or you're told going on) while being much more streamlined.

Also if we're talking about great fantasy authors and great fantasy works, you have to bring up "Name of the Wind" by Patrick Rothfuss. While the sequel isn't as good and I'm not in a huge rush to reread Name of the Wind, I would still strongly recommend reading it. It's considered one of the greatest modern fantasy works for a reason.

For non-fantasy, Sapiens is amazing and I'm enjoying every page of it. Provides an interesting perspective of the pre-ancient civilizations that is just fascinating to me.
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