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book megathread
posted in Off Topic
31
#31
2 Frags +

I wanted to drop some American short stories that I recommend.
Since you can't buy 1 book with all of them I've linked an online source that you can print if you love paper.
If you like a story I recommend getting the book that the story is a part of.
In no particular order:

Pastoralia by George Saunders (2000)
Defender of the Faith by Philip Roth (1959)
Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin (1957)
Love and Honor and Pity and Pride and Compassion and Sacrifice by Nam Le (2012)
People Like That Are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk by Lorrie Moore (1997)
Rock Springs by Richard Ford (1987)

I wanted to drop some American short stories that I recommend.
Since you can't buy 1 book with all of them I've linked an online source that you can print if you love paper.
If you like a story I recommend getting the book that the story is a part of.
In no particular order:

[url=https://we--do--not--sow.tumblr.com/post/19698698381/pastoralia-by-george-saunders]Pastoralia[/url] by George Saunders (2000)
[url=https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1959/03/14/defender-of-the-faith]Defender of the Faith[/url] by Philip Roth (1959)
[url=https://sfponline.org/Uploads/372/sonnysblues.pdf]Sonny's Blues[/url] by James Baldwin (1957)
[url=https://cdn.waterstones.com/special/pdf/9781786898630.pdf]Love and Honor and Pity and Pride and Compassion and Sacrifice by Nam Le[/url] (2012)
[url=https://blogs.commons.georgetown.edu/engl-459-spring2014/files/2014/01/Lorrie-Moore.pdf]People Like That Are the Only People Here: Canonical Babbling in Peed Onk[/url] by Lorrie Moore (1997)
[url=https://granta.com/rock-springs/]Rock Springs[/url] by Richard Ford (1987)
32
#32
1 Frags +

the fire next time & notes of a native son by james baldwin. both are collections of essays but i never get tired of reading or hearing him.
the nickel boys by colson whitehead
in the heart of the sea by nathaniel philbrick
house of leaves by mark z danielewski, though i dont think the book is that great i did think it was fun to read

the fire next time & notes of a native son by james baldwin. both are collections of essays but i never get tired of reading or hearing him.
the nickel boys by colson whitehead
in the heart of the sea by nathaniel philbrick
house of leaves by mark z danielewski, though i dont think the book is that great i did think it was fun to read
33
#33
-1 Frags +
brodyWandumThe Song of Achilles by Madeline Millerthe iliad (ideally the lattimore translation) is just straight up a perfect book dont know what the purpose of a retelling would be except to miss the point

weirdly elitist perspective of a classic text that reeks of a first year literature student. why not read the ancient greek text instead if ur gonna bash someone about which translation theyre reading? why not read classics as they were "meant to be read"? why not huddle around a fire while some guy with a harp recites the whole thing from memory, making up his own version throughout the course of multiple nights? to stan someones english translation so hard is to completely miss the point of studying classics. ive read multiple translations, lattimores, popes and fagles' included, and vastly prefer caroline alexanders, a much more recent and easy to read one. literature, especially classics, is not about gatekeeping.

[quote=brody][quote=Wandum][b]The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller[/b][/quote]
the iliad (ideally the [url=https://www.amazon.com/Iliad-Homer/dp/0226469409?tag=teamfortresst-20]lattimore translation[/url]) is just straight up a perfect book dont know what the purpose of a retelling would be except to miss the point[/quote]
weirdly elitist perspective of a classic text that reeks of a first year literature student. why not read the ancient greek text instead if ur gonna bash someone about which translation theyre reading? why not read classics as they were "meant to be read"? why not huddle around a fire while some guy with a harp recites the whole thing from memory, making up his own version throughout the course of multiple nights? to stan someones english translation so hard is to completely miss the point of studying classics. ive read multiple translations, lattimores, popes and fagles' included, and vastly prefer caroline alexanders, a much more recent and easy to read one. literature, especially classics, is not about gatekeeping.
34
#34
5 Frags +
torrit

Gatekeeping and elitism are the only defenses small communities have against the mass culture that constantly threatens to consume them. This kind of chauvinism is frequently pig-headed and self-defeating, but even when it is, it is driven by that survival instinct.

I'll assume you're right and this book is good, you seem knowledgeable about this stuff. But reading the articles and reviews, the praise the book received focused on its "authenticity to the LGBT themes of the Greek original." I'll buy that the buttfucking was always there, what I don't buy is this convenient projection of modern conceptions of sexuality backwards onto a people with their own culture + philosophy. This looks to me like an attempt by the dominant culture of our time to colonize the past with its own values. Exactly the type of colonization the gatekeeping instinct clumsily attempts to stave off.

[quote=torrit][/quote]
Gatekeeping and elitism are the only defenses small communities have against the mass culture that constantly threatens to consume them. This kind of chauvinism is frequently pig-headed and self-defeating, but even when it is, it is driven by that survival instinct.

I'll assume you're right and this book is good, you seem knowledgeable about this stuff. But reading the articles and reviews, the praise the book received focused on its "authenticity to the LGBT themes of the Greek original." I'll buy that the buttfucking was always there, what I don't buy is this convenient projection of modern conceptions of sexuality backwards onto a people with their own culture + philosophy. This looks to me like an attempt by the dominant culture of our time to colonize the past with its own values. Exactly the type of colonization the gatekeeping instinct clumsily attempts to stave off.
35
#35
1 Frags +

Sherlock Holmes
Caste and Outcast by Dhan Gopal Mukerji
The Captive Mind by Czesław Miłosz
The Gameplayers of Zan
The Idea of Justice by Amartya Sen
The Invincible by Stanislav Lem
The World as I see it by Einstein
My View of the World by Schrodinger

Sherlock Holmes
Caste and Outcast by Dhan Gopal Mukerji
The Captive Mind by Czesław Miłosz
The Gameplayers of Zan
The Idea of Justice by Amartya Sen
The Invincible by Stanislav Lem
The World as I see it by Einstein
My View of the World by Schrodinger
36
#36
0 Frags +

idk what u nerds r talking about but the inkheart series is pretty good

idk what u nerds r talking about but the inkheart series is pretty good
37
#37
0 Frags +

i just finished dune part 1 and loved it

i just finished dune part 1 and loved it
38
#38
3 Frags +
torritsnip

im literally only saying that cos wandum already said he didnt like the new book lol. if miller's book gets people into classics thats great, if they like it by itself thats great, i feel like im doing the opposite of gatekeeping. i generally agree with kiki on everything here but i just think youve slightly misunderstood where im coming from

and yes i would love to be able to read the original texts or hear a homeric recitation but i cant. i tried going thru my dads homeric greek companions and it just never really clicked for me in a natural enough way to really feel like reading

also dont see how recommending a (widely beloved) translation is "stanning" one, im just trying to give a good entry point which i dont think you can say it isnt

anyway, i havent read alexanders translation but per your recommendation ill try to grab a copy for my next read :)

[quote=torrit]snip[/quote]
im literally only saying that cos wandum already said he didnt like the new book lol. if miller's book gets people into classics thats great, if they like it by itself thats great, i feel like im doing the opposite of gatekeeping. i generally agree with kiki on everything here but i just think youve slightly misunderstood where im coming from

and yes i would love to be able to read the original texts or hear a homeric recitation but i cant. i tried going thru my dads homeric greek companions and it just never really clicked for me in a natural enough way to really feel like reading

also dont see how recommending a (widely beloved) translation is "stanning" one, im just trying to give a good entry point which i dont think you can say it isnt

anyway, i havent read alexanders translation but per your recommendation ill try to grab a copy for my next read :)
39
#39
0 Frags +

without gatekeeping we get beowulf translations that start with the word "bro"

without gatekeeping we get beowulf translations that start with the word "bro"
40
#40
0 Frags +

The Golden Bough by James G. Frazer - Man spends 50 years trying to solve the mystery of a Roman cult, and in the process amasses an awesome treasury of lore on almost any culture you can think of. Some of it made up or misremembered by his sources.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman - Odd, transparently personal, moving novel from a man who usually sublimates his private traumas into wacky fairy tales.

Moby Dick - The American Faust in the sense of embodying the spirit of a culture, America being both at war with and in awe of, God, and God's creation.

Typee by Herman Melville - Account of the time he got kidnapped by cannibals and bartered for tobacco. Rare window into a world that had vanished by the time anthropology got its shit together.

The Golden Bough by James G. Frazer - Man spends 50 years trying to solve the mystery of a Roman cult, and in the process amasses an awesome treasury of lore on almost any culture you can think of. Some of it made up or misremembered by his sources.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman - Odd, transparently personal, moving novel from a man who usually sublimates his private traumas into wacky fairy tales.

Moby Dick - The American Faust in the sense of embodying the spirit of a culture, America being both at war with and in awe of, God, and God's creation.

Typee by Herman Melville - Account of the time he got kidnapped by cannibals and bartered for tobacco. Rare window into a world that had vanished by the time anthropology got its shit together.
41
#41
1 Frags +
Brimstonerecently plowed through the Mistborn trilogy so I can second that. I just started digging into other works by Sanderson like his Stormlight Archive series which have been really enjoyable so far as well.

If you like sci-fi, I read Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky before the above and that was really interesting as well.

I loved the Stormlight Archive and Mistborn series by Sanderson, if anybody wants to talk high/grimdark fantasy or needs recommendations talk to me, I'm a huge nerd for fantasy. Children of time was also my favorite sci-fi book i've read semi-recently. Imagine an intelligent and evolving spider civilization interacting with humans and other intelligent insects, but it makes you think yeah this could maybe happen.

WARHURYEAHCurrently reading through WoT. I'm on book 5 out of 15 so far. Plan to go into the Sanderson books afterwards.
SThree Body Problem series - Very good hard science fiction book.

Loved Wheel of Time, it took me almost a year to read it all, but the books are way better than the TV show amazon prime is running right now. It gets a lot better after the first book. Robert Jordan wrote the first book like a LOTR clone so publishers would pick it up.

Three Body Problem is definitely one of my favorite Sci-Fi books all time. It does have some weird tangents, but its super thought provoking and scary at times.

Recently I've been into Stephen King and that's kind of propelled me to get into horror. Standouts from Stephen King for me were The Institute (newer book by him), Salem's Lot, The Stand (he somewhat considers it his magnums opus) and Duma Key (this really weird book about a telekinetic/pathic painter).

For horror I've been reading House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski. This book is really weird and has a cult following. If you want to know more you should probably just google it.

row_The Name of the Wind & The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss are pretty nice reads if you're into fantasy, even though the third book in the trilogy has been coming soon™ for about 11 years at this point - the audiobook versions are good as well.
.

Just noticed Patrick Rothfus was mentioned. I love this trilogy. I read it a while back and it gets a lot of hate because of an overpowered protagonist/weird sex scenes in the second book, but I loved the prose. I've never read a book that flows quite like that, and because the prose is so good I really felt like I could visualize the character interactions and hear the character's voices. I could not put it down. I don't think I've enjoyed a fantasy series as much as those two books.

[quote=Brimstone]recently plowed through the Mistborn trilogy so I can second that. I just started digging into other works by Sanderson like his Stormlight Archive series which have been really enjoyable so far as well.

If you like sci-fi, I read Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky before the above and that was really interesting as well.[/quote]

I loved the Stormlight Archive and Mistborn series by Sanderson, if anybody wants to talk high/grimdark fantasy or needs recommendations talk to me, I'm a huge nerd for fantasy. Children of time was also my favorite sci-fi book i've read semi-recently. Imagine an intelligent and evolving spider civilization interacting with humans and other intelligent insects, but it makes you think yeah this could maybe happen.

[quote=WARHURYEAH]Currently reading through WoT. I'm on book 5 out of 15 so far. Plan to go into the Sanderson books afterwards.
SThree Body Problem series - Very good hard science fiction book.
[/quote]

Loved Wheel of Time, it took me almost a year to read it all, but the books are way better than the TV show amazon prime is running right now. It gets a lot better after the first book. Robert Jordan wrote the first book like a LOTR clone so publishers would pick it up.

Three Body Problem is definitely one of my favorite Sci-Fi books all time. It does have some weird tangents, but its super thought provoking and scary at times.

Recently I've been into Stephen King and that's kind of propelled me to get into horror. Standouts from Stephen King for me were The Institute (newer book by him), Salem's Lot, The Stand (he somewhat considers it his magnums opus) and Duma Key (this really weird book about a telekinetic/pathic painter).

For horror I've been reading House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski. This book is really weird and has a cult following. If you want to know more you should probably just google it.

[quote=row_]
The Name of the Wind & The Wise Man's Fear by Patrick Rothfuss are pretty nice reads if you're into fantasy, even though the third book in the trilogy has been coming soon™ for about 11 years at this point - the audiobook versions are good as well.
.[/quote]

Just noticed Patrick Rothfus was mentioned. I love this trilogy. I read it a while back and it gets a lot of hate because of an overpowered protagonist/weird sex scenes in the second book, but I loved the prose. I've never read a book that flows quite like that, and because the prose is so good I really felt like I could visualize the character interactions and hear the character's voices. I could not put it down. I don't think I've enjoyed a fantasy series as much as those two books.
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