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CoLLeGe
posted in Off Topic
61
#61
6 Frags +

Medicine @ St George's University of London, first year.

Medicine @ St George's University of London, first year.
62
#62
3 Frags +
bearodactylmath w/ concentration in computing at umass amherst (tryna double major in philosophy as well)

yussss

[quote=bearodactyl]math w/ concentration in computing at umass amherst [b](tryna double major in philosophy as well)[/b][/quote]

yussss
63
#63
3 Frags +
dgitluniversity of central florida, computer science and gonna try to specialize in computer security and forensics

How are your professors? I have a good handful of friends who took compsci classes at UCF and were quite miserable with the experience

[quote=dgitl]university of central florida, computer science and gonna try to specialize in computer security and forensics[/quote]
How are your professors? I have a good handful of friends who took compsci classes at UCF and were quite miserable with the experience
64
#64
4 Frags +

materials and nanoscience
university of waterloo

materials and nanoscience
university of waterloo
65
#65
2 Frags +
wolsnedgitluniversity of central florida, computer science and gonna try to specialize in computer security and forensicsHow are your professors? I have a good handful of friends who took compsci classes at UCF and were quite miserable with the experience

Im in my first semester so I cant speak to all CS professors, but my intro to c professor is pretty awful. I took AP CSP/A in high school so I have programming background, but if it wasn't for that I would probably be a little lost. I've heard from many people that there are really great professors in the CS department, though.

[quote=wolsne][quote=dgitl]university of central florida, computer science and gonna try to specialize in computer security and forensics[/quote]
How are your professors? I have a good handful of friends who took compsci classes at UCF and were quite miserable with the experience[/quote]
Im in my first semester so I cant speak to all CS professors, but my intro to c professor is pretty awful. I took AP CSP/A in high school so I have programming background, but if it wasn't for that I would probably be a little lost. I've heard from many people that there are really great professors in the CS department, though.
66
#66
6 Frags +

aerospace engineering at the university of cincinnati.

aerospace engineering at the university of cincinnati.
67
#67
2 Frags +

I finished my GRFP application, feel fairly confident & submitting tomorrow
if I get it, theres advisors at Harvard & GA tech who are kinda interested in my stuff (also one at MIT but he does open ocean so eh)

if I dont prolly just gonna stay at my brewery tho

I finished my GRFP application, feel fairly confident & submitting tomorrow
if I get it, theres advisors at Harvard & GA tech who are kinda interested in my stuff (also one at MIT but he does open ocean so eh)

if I dont prolly just gonna stay at my brewery tho
68
#68
3 Frags +

university of vermont, currently majoring in english but it's always open to change.

university of vermont, currently majoring in english but it's always open to change.
69
#69
3 Frags +

Computer Engineering @ UIUC

Computer Engineering @ UIUC
70
#70
3 Frags +

I'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?

I'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?
71
#71
3 Frags +

math/cs @ cmu

math/cs @ cmu
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#72
6 Frags +
a_m3meI'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?

get good grades and do cool extracurriculars. don't worry about where you're going until late into your junior year, there's no point in trying to plan out where you'll go to college before you even take the SAT/ACT.

[quote=a_m3me]I'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?[/quote]
get good grades and do cool extracurriculars. don't worry about where you're going until late into your junior year, there's no point in trying to plan out where you'll go to college before you even take the SAT/ACT.
73
#73
3 Frags +
Funsguess I’ll start uk unis
biomed @ imperial college london, first year

Holy shit! Congratz

[quote=Funs]guess I’ll start uk unis
biomed @ imperial college london, first year[/quote]
Holy shit! Congratz
74
#74
3 Frags +
a_m3meI'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?

Depends on what state you're in. You or your parents might want to consider that, generally, out-of-state tuition is much higher than in-state. "Good" can be very subjective for universities. Depends on if you're looking for quality instruction, a prestigious name on your degree, good experience, or a party school. Here in California, USC would be a good but very expensive choice if you want to network with business people. Stanford, UC Berkeley, [edit: Caltech,] and UCLA are the most prestigious here. Quality of instruction is probably iffy. If you go to Berkeley, major in EECS not CS. I've heard bad things about University of Maryland for CS. UPENN is supposed to be the toughest for engineering, so probably not much nicer for CS.

I'd also recommend going to community college and then transferring to a university for junior year (unless you get a really good score on the SAT). A good community college is usually much cheaper than a university. The classes are also easier. The downside is you miss out on the "college experience," but CS/engineering majors are usually too busy to have fun anyway.

That said, for a career in CS/programming, I've heard that prior coding experience is more important than the degree itself. Companies want to hire competent programmers, not students who can bring home a good report card. Put some time and effort into extracurriculars and programming projects. (But also get good grades. Never hurts.)

[quote=a_m3me]I'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?[/quote]
Depends on what state you're in. You or your parents might want to consider that, generally, out-of-state tuition is much higher than in-state. "Good" can be very subjective for universities. Depends on if you're looking for quality instruction, a prestigious name on your degree, good experience, or a party school. Here in California, USC would be a good but very expensive choice if you want to network with business people. Stanford, UC Berkeley, [edit: Caltech,] and UCLA are the most prestigious here. Quality of instruction is probably iffy. If you go to Berkeley, major in EECS not CS. I've heard bad things about University of Maryland for CS. UPENN is supposed to be the toughest for engineering, so probably not much nicer for CS.

I'd also recommend going to community college and then transferring to a university for junior year (unless you get a really good score on the SAT). A good community college is usually much cheaper than a university. The classes are also easier. The downside is you miss out on the "college experience," but CS/engineering majors are usually too busy to have fun anyway.

That said, for a career in CS/programming, I've heard that prior coding experience is more important than the degree itself. Companies want to hire competent programmers, not students who can bring home a good report card. Put some time and effort into extracurriculars and programming projects. (But also get good grades. Never hurts.)
75
#75
3 Frags +

history education @ rvc till i transfer to niu in 2020

history education @ rvc till i transfer to niu in 2020
76
#76
4 Frags +

electronic engineering at city of glasgow college hopefully i can get into strathclyde uni with my hnd when i get it xoxo

electronic engineering at city of glasgow college hopefully i can get into strathclyde uni with my hnd when i get it xoxo
77
#77
2 Frags +

electrical/computer engineering at cmu

electrical/computer engineering at cmu
78
#78
2 Frags +

Analytical Chemistry major at George Mason in VA but I'm transferring up to UMASS amherst or UNH

Analytical Chemistry major at George Mason in VA but I'm transferring up to UMASS amherst or UNH
79
#79
3 Frags +
Bilberta_m3meI'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?Depends on what state you're in. You or your parents might want to consider that, generally, out-of-state tuition is much higher than in-state. "Good" can be very subjective for universities. Depends on if you're looking for quality instruction, a prestigious name on your degree, good experience, or a party school. Here in California, USC would be a good but very expensive choice if you want to network with business people. Stanford, UC Berkeley, and UCLA are the most prestigious here. Quality of instruction is probably iffy. If you go to Berkeley, major in EECS not CS. I've heard bad things about University of Maryland for CS. UPENN is supposed to be the toughest for engineering, so probably not much nicer for CS.

I'd also recommend going to community college and then transferring to a university for junior year (unless you get a really good score on the SAT). A good community college is usually much cheaper than a university. The classes are also easier. The downside is you miss out on the "college experience," but CS/engineering majors are usually too busy to have fun anyway.

That said, for a career in CS/programming, I've heard that prior coding experience is more important than the degree itself. Companies want to hire competent programmers, not students who can bring home a good report card. Put some time and effort into extracurriculars and programming projects. (But also get good grades. Never hurts.)

Berkeley EECS student here, I'm curious why you think majoring in CS here isn't worth it. Meeting the 3.3 GPA cutoff to declare CS can be stressful, but over half the kids that want to declare CS do so. Once you declare the CS major, EECS and CS are identical in terms of degrees except EECS being a Bachelors of Science and CS being a Bachelors of Arts. EECS and CS take the same classes and have the same degree requirements too (different breadth requirements though). Employment wise they are practically the same too with median starting salaries for both at ~110k. There isn't any difference between EECS and CS for grad school admissions either, if anything, majoring in CS frees up space to take more upper div math and stats classes which can be beneficial.

EDIT: Also in terms of quality of instruction, all my EECS classes have been taught by full professors and considering they are EECS professors at Berkeley, they are some of the best. I think the quality of instruction is pretty high. Also in terms of difficulty, I would say that MIT and Berkeley are more difficult than other top CS programs just because there's pretty insane grade deflation here at Cal and MIT doesn't practice grade inflation either (unlike other schools like Stanford, Penn etc)

[quote=Bilbert][quote=a_m3me]I'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?[/quote]
Depends on what state you're in. You or your parents might want to consider that, generally, out-of-state tuition is much higher than in-state. "Good" can be very subjective for universities. Depends on if you're looking for quality instruction, a prestigious name on your degree, good experience, or a party school. Here in California, USC would be a good but very expensive choice if you want to network with business people. Stanford, UC Berkeley, and UCLA are the most prestigious here. Quality of instruction is probably iffy. If you go to Berkeley, major in EECS not CS. I've heard bad things about University of Maryland for CS. UPENN is supposed to be the toughest for engineering, so probably not much nicer for CS.

I'd also recommend going to community college and then transferring to a university for junior year (unless you get a really good score on the SAT). A good community college is usually much cheaper than a university. The classes are also easier. The downside is you miss out on the "college experience," but CS/engineering majors are usually too busy to have fun anyway.

That said, for a career in CS/programming, I've heard that prior coding experience is more important than the degree itself. Companies want to hire competent programmers, not students who can bring home a good report card. Put some time and effort into extracurriculars and programming projects. (But also get good grades. Never hurts.)[/quote]

Berkeley EECS student here, I'm curious why you think majoring in CS here isn't worth it. Meeting the 3.3 GPA cutoff to declare CS can be stressful, but over half the kids that want to declare CS do so. Once you declare the CS major, EECS and CS are identical in terms of degrees except EECS being a Bachelors of Science and CS being a Bachelors of Arts. EECS and CS take the same classes and have the same degree requirements too (different breadth requirements though). Employment wise they are practically the same too with median starting salaries for both at ~110k. There isn't any difference between EECS and CS for grad school admissions either, if anything, majoring in CS frees up space to take more upper div math and stats classes which can be beneficial.

EDIT: Also in terms of quality of instruction, all my EECS classes have been taught by full professors and considering they are EECS professors at Berkeley, they are some of the best. I think the quality of instruction is pretty high. Also in terms of difficulty, I would say that MIT and Berkeley are more difficult than other top CS programs just because there's pretty insane grade deflation here at Cal and MIT doesn't practice grade inflation either (unlike other schools like Stanford, Penn etc)
80
#80
2 Frags +
eeeI finished my GRFP application, feel fairly confident & submitting tomorrow
if I get it, theres advisors at Harvard & GA tech who are kinda interested in my stuff (also one at MIT but he does open ocean so eh)

doesnt nsf announce the awards well after admissions? expressly to avoid having the GRFP affect admissions?

[quote=eee]I finished my GRFP application, feel fairly confident & submitting tomorrow
if I get it, theres advisors at Harvard & GA tech who are kinda interested in my stuff (also one at MIT but he does open ocean so eh)[/quote]
doesnt nsf announce the awards well after admissions? expressly to avoid having the GRFP affect admissions?
81
#81
2 Frags +
CleepopleBilberta_m3meI'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?

A BA in CS from Berkeley is nothing to sneeze at. It's going to get you as far in the computing world as an EECS BS will. My opinion is that, if you're going for a computing degree from Berkeley, EECS is the simpler path to getting the degree. It gets that GPA cutoff out of the way. And they keep raising the cutoff point. It depends on what you want though. The College of Engineering is harder to get into straight out of highschool.

If you're transferring from community college, definitely go EECS. You get admitted straight into the major. Even as a junior transfer to CS, you get admitted to L&S and still have to apply to the CS major.

What year are you? I admit I'm not working from first-hand experience for the quality of instruction. I've heard from Mech Engie undergrads that the professors at Berkeley are dreadful. Especially transfer students notice that their community college professors were much better at teaching. Usually, professors at top institutions are there because they do good graduate-level research, not because they are good at teaching undergraduates.

Edit: Also, I have a compilation of rude, discouraging, and straight up mean remarks that current and former Berkeley professors have made to their students.

[quote=Cleepople][quote=Bilbert][quote=a_m3me]I'm 13. I want to go to a college that has a good computer course, however. Suggestions?
[/quote]
[/quote]
[/quote]
A BA in CS from Berkeley is nothing to sneeze at. It's going to get you as far in the computing world as an EECS BS will. My opinion is that, if you're going for a computing degree from Berkeley, EECS is the simpler path to getting the degree. It gets that GPA cutoff out of the way. And they keep raising the cutoff point. It depends on what you want though. The College of Engineering is harder to get into straight out of highschool.

If you're transferring from community college, definitely go EECS. You get admitted straight into the major. Even as a junior transfer to CS, you get admitted to L&S and still have to apply to the CS major.

What year are you? I admit I'm not working from first-hand experience for the quality of instruction. I've heard from Mech Engie undergrads that the professors at Berkeley are dreadful. Especially transfer students notice that their community college professors were much better at teaching. Usually, professors at top institutions are there because they do good graduate-level research, not because they are good at teaching undergraduates.

Edit: Also, I have a compilation of rude, discouraging, and straight up mean remarks that current and former Berkeley professors have made to their students.
82
#82
1 Frags +
poopsharkeeeI finished my GRFP application, feel fairly confident & submitting tomorrow
if I get it, theres advisors at Harvard & GA tech who are kinda interested in my stuff (also one at MIT but he does open ocean so eh)
doesnt nsf announce the awards well after admissions? expressly to avoid having the GRFP affect admissions?

in theory. in my field, advisors can pretty much take you on whenever they want, especially if you're independently funded
my proposal was basically derived from my work, anyway, and the potential advisors whove seen it felt confident in my chances (as confident as can be at least), and I'm kinda half sure I'll be able to make two Applications b/c the rules are weird

did you submit anything? shit v nearly killed me, I spent prolly 20 hours a weekend on it this month

[quote=poopshark][quote=eee]I finished my GRFP application, feel fairly confident & submitting tomorrow
if I get it, theres advisors at Harvard & GA tech who are kinda interested in my stuff (also one at MIT but he does open ocean so eh)[/quote]
doesnt nsf announce the awards well after admissions? expressly to avoid having the GRFP affect admissions?[/quote]
in theory. in my field, advisors can pretty much take you on whenever they want, especially if you're independently funded
my proposal was basically derived from my work, anyway, and the potential advisors whove seen it felt confident in my chances (as confident as can be at least), and I'm kinda half sure I'll be able to make two Applications b/c the rules are weird

did you submit anything? shit v nearly killed me, I spent prolly 20 hours a weekend on it this month
83
#83
11 Frags +

https://i.imgur.com/tUbvFPd.jpg

sic em bears

[img]https://i.imgur.com/tUbvFPd.jpg[/img]
sic em bears
84
#84
4 Frags +

Economics at UC Santa Barbara

Economics at UC Santa Barbara
85
#85
3 Frags +

Gonna be heading to SMU for school this fall, if anyone's in the Dallas/FW Area HMU

Gonna be heading to SMU for school this fall, if anyone's in the Dallas/FW Area HMU
86
#86
3 Frags +

mathematics at uc san diego

mathematics at uc san diego
87
#87
4 Frags +

Heading down to university of victoria this fall for Biochemistry/Chemistry

Heading down to university of victoria this fall for Biochemistry/Chemistry
88
#88
2 Frags +
reakomathematics at uc san diego

Yo, I’m starting in data science there next year!

[quote=reako]mathematics at uc san diego[/quote]

Yo, I’m starting in data science there next year!
89
#89
2 Frags +

junior spanish/econ major @WillametteU

junior spanish/econ major @WillametteU
90
#90
2 Frags +

Business Entrepreneurship at Seneca College in the Fall :)

Business Entrepreneurship at Seneca College in the Fall :)
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