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is high dpi bad on low res
posted in Hardware
1
#1
0 Frags +

I've heard that low dpi on a fairly high res (4K), can cause an issue, like where the one mouse "tick" moves your cursor more than one pixel on screen.

However, does the opposite hold true as well? I'm using 6000 dpi, and .167 sens, and I wanna know if the high dpi will cause an issue w/ the game if I run on a fairly low res, (1152x864)

thanks in advance

I've heard that low dpi on a fairly high res (4K), can cause an issue, like where the one mouse "tick" moves your cursor more than one pixel on screen.

However, does the opposite hold true as well? I'm using 6000 dpi, and .167 sens, and I wanna know if the high dpi will cause an issue w/ the game if I run on a fairly low res, (1152x864)

thanks in advance
2
#2
2 Frags +

it's just gonna be hard to move your cursor precisely.

it's just gonna be hard to move your cursor precisely.
3
#3
1 Frags +

_

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4
#4
3 Frags +

no it wont jitter. high dpi low sens is better because your mouse is measuring in smaller resolutions, as opposed to just multiplying up your mouse inputs (which is what causes the skipping you mentioned)

no it wont jitter. high dpi low sens is better because your mouse is measuring in smaller resolutions, as opposed to just multiplying up your mouse inputs (which is what causes the skipping you mentioned)
5
#5
2 Frags +

Something to note though is that without raw input and at low fps potentially, if you move your cursor far enough that it hits the edge of the screen / moves overs to a secondary monitor, it will cause issues (negative accel by hitting the edge of the screen, losing focus on tf2 entirely by hitting the secondary monitor). Raw input doesn't run into this issue afaik, but I stand to be corrected.

You should use whatever dpi is native to your mouse sensor though, and that (depending on the sensor model) will usually range from 400-1600. The increase in granularity by increasing dpi and lowering sensitivity generally isn't worth it compared to potential issues from using non-native dpi's.

Something to note though is that without raw input and at low fps potentially, if you move your cursor far enough that it hits the edge of the screen / moves overs to a secondary monitor, it will cause issues (negative accel by hitting the edge of the screen, losing focus on tf2 entirely by hitting the secondary monitor). Raw input doesn't run into this issue afaik, but I stand to be corrected.

You should use whatever dpi is native to your mouse sensor though, and that (depending on the sensor model) will usually range from 400-1600. The increase in granularity by increasing dpi and lowering sensitivity generally isn't worth it compared to potential issues from using non-native dpi's.
6
#6
5 Frags +
BumFreezeno it wont jitter. high dpi low sens is better because your mouse is measuring in smaller resolutions, as opposed to just multiplying up your mouse inputs (which is what causes the skipping you mentioned)

generally true yeah, but it's important to note that higher dpi doesnt necessarily mean better. a lot of mouse sensors become less accurate at higher dpi

[quote=BumFreeze]no it wont jitter. high dpi low sens is better because your mouse is measuring in smaller resolutions, as opposed to just multiplying up your mouse inputs (which is what causes the skipping you mentioned)[/quote]

generally true yeah, but it's important to note that higher dpi doesnt necessarily mean better. a lot of mouse sensors become less accurate at higher dpi
7
#7
-2 Frags +

no.

no.
8
#8
2 Frags +
JarateKingSomething to note though is that without raw input and at low fps potentially, if you move your cursor far enough that it hits the edge of the screen / moves overs to a secondary monitor, it will cause issues (negative accel by hitting the edge of the screen, losing focus on tf2 entirely by hitting the secondary monitor).

I had this issue a lot when i played with really low/variable framerates. There is a very good and performant tool that offers a monitor-locking feature that locks your cursor to a specified monitor on demand. (It also has tons of other very useful features): http://dualmonitortool.sourceforge.net/dmt.html

Heres some documentation on the cursor features: http://dualmonitortool.sourceforge.net/dmt_cursor.html

JarateKingRaw input doesn't run into this issue afaik, but I stand to be corrected

I've definitely ran into this issue on raw input! I'm not sure if it makes a difference on how often it occurs or not, though - maybe it does.

[quote=JarateKing]Something to note though is that without raw input and at low fps potentially, if you move your cursor far enough that it hits the edge of the screen / moves overs to a secondary monitor, it will cause issues (negative accel by hitting the edge of the screen, losing focus on tf2 entirely by hitting the secondary monitor).[/quote]

I had this issue a lot when i played with really low/variable framerates. There is a very good and performant tool that offers a monitor-locking feature that locks your cursor to a specified monitor on demand. (It also has tons of other very useful features): http://dualmonitortool.sourceforge.net/dmt.html

Heres some documentation on the cursor features: http://dualmonitortool.sourceforge.net/dmt_cursor.html

[quote=JarateKing]Raw input doesn't run into this issue afaik, but I stand to be corrected[/quote]

I've definitely ran into this issue on raw input! I'm not sure if it makes a difference on how often it occurs or not, though - maybe it does.
9
#9
3 Frags +
BumFreezeno it wont jitter. high dpi low sens is better because your mouse is measuring in smaller resolutions, as opposed to just multiplying up your mouse inputs (which is what causes the skipping you mentioned)

I want to expand upon this.

The best scenario is one where your in-game sensitivity doesn't actually change the incoming value. What I mean by this is any multiplication or division done on your sensitivity will cause some loss of precision between your mouse movement and the movement on screen.

Unfourtunately, modern mice don't have resolutions high enough to make cl_yaw 1; sensitivity 1; feasible. So, my general rule of thumb to reduce this loss in precision as much as possible is to keep cl_yaw default, and set sensitivity to 1 - then change your DPI to compensate.

For example, I currently use a 10.9"/360 sensitivity - at 500 DPI thats 3 in-game sensitivity. Dividing sens by 3 gives me 1, and balancing out my DPI by multiplying it by 3 gives me 1500 DPI.

Is the difference in precision noticeable? Probably not. But, I'm stupid and like to use "optimal" settings even when it really doesn't matter.

[quote=BumFreeze]no it wont jitter. high dpi low sens is better because your mouse is measuring in smaller resolutions, as opposed to just multiplying up your mouse inputs (which is what causes the skipping you mentioned)[/quote]

I want to expand upon this.

The best scenario is one where your in-game sensitivity doesn't actually change the incoming value. What I mean by this is [i]any[/i] multiplication or division done on your sensitivity will cause some loss of precision between your mouse movement and the movement on screen.

Unfourtunately, modern mice don't have resolutions high enough to make cl_yaw 1; sensitivity 1; feasible. So, my general rule of thumb to reduce this loss in precision as much as possible is to keep cl_yaw default, and set sensitivity to 1 - then change your DPI to compensate.

For example, I currently use a 10.9"/360 sensitivity - at 500 DPI thats 3 in-game sensitivity. Dividing sens by 3 gives me 1, and balancing out my DPI by multiplying it by 3 gives me 1500 DPI.

Is the difference in precision noticeable? Probably not. But, I'm stupid and like to use "optimal" settings even when it really doesn't matter.
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