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Biking help
posted in Off Topic
1
#1
0 Frags +

Hey, recently thought about biking at the local state park near me. There's both a mountain bike trail and paved bike trails. i want to use both but im not sure which type of bike to settle with. I also don't really know where to buy one as well. If anyone is experienced with biking i would appreciate some advice because i am big noober.

Hey, recently thought about biking at the local state park near me. There's both a mountain bike trail and paved bike trails. i want to use both but im not sure which type of bike to settle with. I also don't really know where to buy one as well. If anyone is experienced with biking i would appreciate some advice because i am big noober.
2
#2
-12 Frags +

Walmart has mountain bikes and regular bikes

Walmart has mountain bikes and regular bikes
3
#3
1 Frags +

yea im not looking for a walmart bike, would prefer one that would last for a good while. last bike i got was from target and broke within 2 weeks

yea im not looking for a walmart bike, would prefer one that would last for a good while. last bike i got was from target and broke within 2 weeks
4
#4
11 Frags +

you'll just wanna google used bike stores in your area (if you live in a city), then go down and ask them for help. there are hybrid bikes if you want to run both mountain biking trails and road. if you get like a 2014 or something it'll probably be as-new (also lots of used retailers offer a one-time free full repair or something as a sort of warranty).

if you plan to do a ton of commuting with a bike in future, buy a road bike, they're smoother and faster. if you really plan to do trails often, go for a mountain or hybrid. be honest with yourself because bikes can be pricey.

but really have this conversation in person with someone who works at a used bike store while looking at and judging various models. i've been in the same situation, back when i knew nothing about biking. it was extremely helpful.

you'll just wanna google used bike stores in your area (if you live in a city), then go down and ask them for help. there are hybrid bikes if you want to run both mountain biking trails and road. if you get like a 2014 or something it'll probably be as-new (also lots of used retailers offer a one-time free full repair or something as a sort of warranty).

if you plan to do a ton of commuting with a bike in future, buy a road bike, they're smoother and faster. if you really plan to do trails often, go for a mountain or hybrid. be honest with yourself because bikes can be pricey.

but really have this conversation in person with someone who works at a used bike store while looking at and judging various models. i've been in the same situation, back when i knew nothing about biking. it was extremely helpful.
5
#5
1 Frags +

If you want to use a mountain bike and paved trail look at Hybrid bikes.

Riding a mountain bike on a paved road gets really tiring because of the tires. And a Road bike can't handle off road well at all

If you want to use a mountain bike and paved trail look at Hybrid bikes.

Riding a mountain bike on a paved road gets really tiring because of the tires. And a Road bike can't handle off road well at all
6
#6
-2 Frags +

If you're gonna go on mostly paved trails and roads then you should build a fixie bike, it's pretty cheap and not that hard to do

If you're gonna go on mostly paved trails and roads then you should build a fixie bike, it's pretty cheap and not that hard to do
7
#7
5 Frags +

You won t find the best answers on here tbh , a thread on reddit would be much better .
If you re gonna go with a mtb , go with a hardtail , they re much lighter (unless you re gonna be spending thousands of dollars , which doesn t make sense for a first bike ) and cheaper They re also capable of handling trails and can actually beat full suspension bikes on some trails with skill (they do get owned on downhills) a hardtail will also force you to learn skills that you might ignore if you were on a full suspension bike depending on the trails (beginners usually let the suspension do all the work and end up not trying to learn ). They re also obviously better for riding on the street and you can fuck around , jump stuff and have more fun imo (if you don t plan on getting a road bike ).
I m not from the USA but don t buy from wallmart , most bikers in the usa would tell you that they sell overpriced bikes that are pretty shit and will break easily.
From my experience , most hybird bikes aren t worth it if you wanna do anysort of trails , and mountain bikes are already comfortable enough for most people.
tldr : hardtail / There has been threads like this on reddit if you re not convinced.

You won t find the best answers on here tbh , a thread on reddit would be much better .
If you re gonna go with a mtb , go with a hardtail , they re much lighter (unless you re gonna be spending thousands of dollars , which doesn t make sense for a first bike ) and cheaper They re also capable of handling trails and can actually beat full suspension bikes on some trails with skill (they do get owned on downhills) a hardtail will also force you to learn skills that you might ignore if you were on a full suspension bike depending on the trails (beginners usually let the suspension do all the work and end up not trying to learn ). They re also obviously better for riding on the street and you can fuck around , jump stuff and have more fun imo (if you don t plan on getting a road bike ).
I m not from the USA but don t buy from wallmart , most bikers in the usa would tell you that they sell overpriced bikes that are pretty shit and will break easily.
From my experience , most hybird bikes aren t worth it if you wanna do anysort of trails , and mountain bikes are already comfortable enough for most people.
tldr : hardtail / There has been threads like this on reddit if you re not convinced.
8
#8
-7 Frags +

dunno if you skate or do other movement based sports, but biking is fuckin scary once you get going. think about how fast you are moving and how difficult it is to safely dismount from a bike compared to something like a skateboard. i busted my chin open doing BMX once, 11 stitches and chipped tooth. not saying you will get hurt on a bike, they are really great. but damned if they arent dangerous.

dunno if you skate or do other movement based sports, but biking is fuckin scary once you get going. think about how fast you are moving and how difficult it is to safely dismount from a bike compared to something like a skateboard. i busted my chin open doing BMX once, 11 stitches and chipped tooth. not saying you will get hurt on a bike, they are really great. but damned if they arent dangerous.
9
#9
13 Frags +
ILLEGALELEPHANTGUNdunno if you skate or do other movement based sports, but biking is fuckin scary once you get going.

what are you, a pussy
also he's doing mountain biking not BMX

[quote=ILLEGALELEPHANTGUN]dunno if you skate or do other movement based sports, but biking is fuckin scary once you get going. [/quote]
what are you, a pussy
also he's doing mountain biking not BMX
10
#10
10 Frags +
ILLEGALELEPHANTGUNhow difficult it is to safely dismount from a bike compared to something like a skateboard

What

It's not only safer but easier to brake on a bike than it is on a skateboard because bikes have actual brakes instead of your foot

[quote=ILLEGALELEPHANTGUN]how difficult it is to safely dismount from a bike compared to something like a skateboard[/quote]

What

It's not only safer but easier to brake on a bike than it is on a skateboard because bikes have actual brakes instead of your foot
11
#11
1 Frags +
Max_It's not only safer but easier to brake on a bike than it is on a skateboard because bikes have actual brakes instead of your foot

I mean, you can bail off a skateboard though and just roll (i think, I don't skateboard) whereas on a bike if you wipe out the bike can get in your way and you get hurt. I gouged my leg going over my handlebars once. That said if you know how to ride a bike and you aren't trying to take a sharp turn while going downhill really fast or something like that a bike is hard to fall off of/crash.

[quote=Max_]
It's not only safer but easier to brake on a bike than it is on a skateboard because bikes have actual brakes instead of your foot[/quote]

I mean, you can bail off a skateboard though and just roll (i think, I don't skateboard) whereas on a bike if you wipe out the bike can get in your way and you get hurt. I gouged my leg going over my handlebars once. That said if you know how to ride a bike and you aren't trying to take a sharp turn while going downhill really fast or something like that a bike is hard to fall off of/crash.
12
#12
0 Frags +

so i have done a lot of research today about all the different variants and whatnot and gear that i need to get and it is a lot more expensive than i originally thought. I'm planning to possibly get a cheap walmart one today due to funds being a lot lower. then hopefully i am able to get a job over the summer and save up enough for a good one from the local REI store. i really want to start as soon as possible so hopefully the walmart bike is not as terrible as some that i've had before / seen in videos. I appreciate all the tips though. thank u

so i have done a lot of research today about all the different variants and whatnot and gear that i need to get and it is a lot more expensive than i originally thought. I'm planning to possibly get a cheap walmart one today due to funds being a lot lower. then hopefully i am able to get a job over the summer and save up enough for a good one from the local REI store. i really want to start as soon as possible so hopefully the walmart bike is not as terrible as some that i've had before / seen in videos. I appreciate all the tips though. thank u
13
#13
8 Frags +

maybe i can shed some light on the old mountain biking scene,
basics you will need are: helmet, pump, puncture repair kit and a bike. Helmet is not an option regardless of the laws around the place, if you crash you will want the hit to got to the helmet not your head. pump and repair kit is useful if not essential, if you get a puncture from a sharp rock or dropping of something in the middle of nowhere, fixing the puncture there is so much better than walking out!
Bike-wise you have two types of mountain bike, hard tails and full suspension. hard tails are the go to bike for beginners and are much cheaper and easier to maintain. A full suspension is more effective but more expensive. tldr is hard tails have suspension at the front but none in the rear whereas the full suspension does. When choosing a bike you want to go for as much quality as you can for as much as you can afford. most cheap "warehouse" bikes (similar to the quality of wallmart i imagine) are no brand, 3 x 9 crappers with extra crap that is unnecessary and annoying to maintain. if you have the time/money look at going to an actual bike shop and buying one make for mtb, plus the guys there will be able to help you with all your questions.
and always, always tell someone where you are going and when you will be back by if you are riding alone!

if you have any follow up questions ask awayi know far too much about bikes

maybe i can shed some light on the old mountain biking scene,
basics you will need are: helmet, pump, puncture repair kit and a bike. Helmet is not an option regardless of the laws around the place, if you crash you will want the hit to got to the helmet not your head. pump and repair kit is useful if not essential, if you get a puncture from a sharp rock or dropping of something in the middle of nowhere, fixing the puncture there is so much better than walking out!
Bike-wise you have two types of mountain bike, hard tails and full suspension. hard tails are the go to bike for beginners and are much cheaper and easier to maintain. A full suspension is more effective but more expensive. tldr is hard tails have suspension at the front but none in the rear whereas the full suspension does. When choosing a bike you want to go for as much quality as you can for as much as you can afford. most cheap "warehouse" bikes (similar to the quality of wallmart i imagine) are no brand, 3 x 9 crappers with extra crap that is unnecessary and annoying to maintain. if you have the time/money look at going to an actual bike shop and buying one make for mtb, plus the guys there will be able to help you with all your questions.
and always, always tell someone where you are going and when you will be back by if you are riding alone!

if you have any follow up questions ask awayi know far too much about bikes
14
#14
3 Frags +

I misread the title to "Bikini help".
I'm disappointed

I misread the title to "Bikini help".
I'm disappointed
15
#15
2 Frags +
rowpiecesso i have done a lot of research today about all the different variants and whatnot and gear that i need to get and it is a lot more expensice than i originally thought. I'm planning to possibly get a cheap walmart one today due to funds being a lot liwer. then hopefully i am able to get a job over the summer and save up enough for a good one from the local REI store. i really want to start as soon as possible so hopefully the walmart bike is not as terrible as some that i've had before / seen in videos. I appreciate all the tips though. thank u

i really, really, would check craigslist/user stores but especially craigslist before you buy anything from walmart.

i didn't mention it before because i thought you would just go to a used store and spend like 250-300 (depending where you are maybe up to 500), but if you're in the <200 range more then just check craiglist and be patient for a week or two. bikes are like the most commonly sold thing on craiglist esp. in college towns

[quote=rowpieces]so i have done a lot of research today about all the different variants and whatnot and gear that i need to get and it is a lot more expensice than i originally thought. I'm planning to possibly get a cheap walmart one today due to funds being a lot liwer. then hopefully i am able to get a job over the summer and save up enough for a good one from the local REI store. i really want to start as soon as possible so hopefully the walmart bike is not as terrible as some that i've had before / seen in videos. I appreciate all the tips though. thank u[/quote]
i really, really, would check craigslist/user stores but especially craigslist before you buy anything from walmart.

i didn't mention it before because i thought you would just go to a used store and spend like 250-300 (depending where you are maybe up to 500), but if you're in the <200 range more then just check craiglist and be patient for a week or two. bikes are like the most commonly sold thing on craiglist esp. in college towns
16
#16
4 Frags +

picking up an old mountain bike from a family friend, a schwinn

picking up an old mountain bike from a family friend, a schwinn
17
#17
3 Frags +

good on ya mate!
just learn how to keep it running and enjoy the riding.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arwxbuYcRvA&list=PL5S7V5NhM8JQoi8vhELX-9aYHmRtmCveT

this guy has some good advice on just starting up on mountain bike tracks, ep 3 might be most relevant to you

good on ya mate!
just learn how to keep it running and enjoy the riding.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arwxbuYcRvA&list=PL5S7V5NhM8JQoi8vhELX-9aYHmRtmCveT

this guy has some good advice on just starting up on mountain bike tracks, ep 3 might be most relevant to you
18
#18
3 Frags +
bioooooooo. A full suspension is more effective but more expensive.

On some rare trails , pro mtb racers actually use hardtails (weight , transfering pedalling power to the wheel much more efficiently) . so basically on non bumpy / technical downhills or sections , the hardtail should out accelerate/out run the FS bike if riders are equal .
It s kinda unfair to straight up say that FS bikes are more effective when that s not always the case , and honestly every beginner who wants to improve should get a hardtail then a FS when he gets the basics of technical riding down , instead of not learning anything and letting the suspension do all the work 0

[quote=bioooooooo]. A full suspension is more effective but more expensive. [/quote]
On some rare trails , pro mtb racers actually use hardtails (weight , transfering pedalling power to the wheel much more efficiently) . so basically on non bumpy / technical downhills or sections , the hardtail should out accelerate/out run the FS bike if riders are equal .
It s kinda unfair to straight up say that FS bikes are more effective when that s not always the case , and honestly every beginner who wants to improve should get a hardtail then a FS when he gets the basics of technical riding down , instead of not learning anything and letting the suspension do all the work 0
19
#19
-4 Frags +
Max_ILLEGALELEPHANTGUNhow difficult it is to safely dismount from a bike compared to something like a skateboard
What

It's not only safer but easier to brake on a bike than it is on a skateboard because bikes have actual brakes instead of your foot

okay how about this:
you need to bail out because you are about to eat shit
skateboard - jump off, land on feet, youre good
bike - gl
just speaking from experience, and i know he said mtb not bmx, but a bike is a bike, and my point was about dismounting one, not the sport.

[quote=Max_][quote=ILLEGALELEPHANTGUN]how difficult it is to safely dismount from a bike compared to something like a skateboard[/quote]

What

It's not only safer but easier to brake on a bike than it is on a skateboard because bikes have actual brakes instead of your foot[/quote]
okay how about this:
you need to bail out because you are about to eat shit
skateboard - jump off, land on feet, youre good
bike - gl
just speaking from experience, and i know he said mtb not bmx, but a bike is a bike, and my point was about dismounting one, not the sport.
20
#20
6 Frags +

ok you had a shitty experience and probably did dumb shit on your bike, why are you bringing skateboarding into this thread, the dude is asking for bike suggestions for biking

ok you had a shitty experience and probably did dumb shit on your bike, why are you bringing skateboarding into this thread, the dude is asking for bike suggestions for [b]biking[/b]
21
#21
3 Frags +

hybrid is what you're looking for. wouldn't recommend a road bike for anyone who isn't VERY into biking + you want to take it on trails so that's a no-go. i'd honestly skip the wal-mart bike and just look on craigslist. a lot of people will let barely used bikes go for a fraction of what they cost since they take up a decent amount of space if you live in an apt/don't have a garage.

bought a giant escape 3 XL this year and really glad i went with it, performs well on the road and i can take it on a few trails/shortcuts near me.

just save up and buy the better bike dude.

hybrid is what you're looking for. wouldn't recommend a road bike for anyone who isn't VERY into biking + you want to take it on trails so that's a no-go. i'd honestly skip the wal-mart bike and just look on craigslist. a lot of people will let barely used bikes go for a fraction of what they cost since they take up a decent amount of space if you live in an apt/don't have a garage.

bought a giant escape 3 XL this year and really glad i went with it, performs well on the road and i can take it on a few trails/shortcuts near me.

just save up and buy the better bike dude.
22
#22
2 Frags +
acbioooooooo. A full suspension is more effective but more expensive. On some rare trails , pro mtb racers actually use hardtails (weight , transfering pedalling power to the wheel much more efficiently) . so basically on non bumpy / technical downhills or sections , the hardtail should out accelerate/out run the FS bike if riders are equal .
It s kinda unfair to straight up say that FS bikes are more effective when that s not always the case , and honestly every beginner who wants to improve should get a hardtail then a FS when he gets the basics of technical riding down , instead of not learning anything and letting the suspension do all the work 0

oh i would totally agree with you, for learning the basics and getting the technical stuff down a hard tail is the right choice. Maybe i worded it poorly in comparing(dismissing?) a HT to a FS but all the mountain biking in nz is rooty, rocky goodness so i would all ways say a FS is king. I can imagine a HT would be right as rain for some trails but in my experience a FS covers the most ground.

[quote=ac][quote=bioooooooo]. A full suspension is more effective but more expensive. [/quote]
On some rare trails , pro mtb racers actually use hardtails (weight , transfering pedalling power to the wheel much more efficiently) . so basically on non bumpy / technical downhills or sections , the hardtail should out accelerate/out run the FS bike if riders are equal .
It s kinda unfair to straight up say that FS bikes are more effective when that s not always the case , and honestly every beginner who wants to improve should get a hardtail then a FS when he gets the basics of technical riding down , instead of not learning anything and letting the suspension do all the work 0[/quote]
oh i would totally agree with you, for learning the basics and getting the technical stuff down a hard tail is the right choice. Maybe i worded it poorly in comparing(dismissing?) a HT to a FS but all the mountain biking in nz is rooty, rocky goodness so i would all ways say a FS is king. I can imagine a HT would be right as rain for some trails but in my experience a FS covers the most ground.
23
#23
0 Frags +

I second the option for a Hybrid bike. I purchased mine in 2007 and it's still wonderful, it's a Gary Fisher Zebrano (owned by Trek, I think I spent about $500? for it) and what I like most is that it's a hybrid with front suspension that you can lock or unlock. It's PERFECT for basic commute biking or dirt trails, the wheels are slightly wider than road bikes but not as bulky and heavy as mountain tires.

I picked it out and was fitted at a local bike shop, which was great because they also provided me free maintenance for a couple years after the purchase.

https://bicyclebluebook.blob.core.windows.net/zoom/gf_zebgs_09_z.jpg

Also check out: http://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/recommended/17-for-2017-the-best-fitness-and-hybrid-bikes-of-2017/slide/16

I second the option for a Hybrid bike. I purchased mine in 2007 and it's still wonderful, it's a Gary Fisher Zebrano (owned by Trek, I think I spent about $500? for it) and what I like most is that it's a hybrid with front suspension that you can lock or unlock. It's PERFECT for basic commute biking or dirt trails, the wheels are slightly wider than road bikes but not as bulky and heavy as mountain tires.

I picked it out and was fitted at a local bike shop, which was great because they also provided me free maintenance for a couple years after the purchase.

[img]https://bicyclebluebook.blob.core.windows.net/zoom/gf_zebgs_09_z.jpg[/img]

Also check out: http://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/recommended/17-for-2017-the-best-fitness-and-hybrid-bikes-of-2017/slide/16
24
#24
3 Frags +

I gotta say anyone recommending a hybrid for mountain bike trails is fucking nuts. A bike like in #23 will be a hazard on any real singletrack. #7 and #13 know what they are talking about. If you want to mountain bike get a hardtail. Anything less will be a gimped experience. However, if you're talking about riding on flat, wide, hard packed dirt or gravel trails get a hybrid.

I gotta say anyone recommending a hybrid for mountain bike trails is fucking nuts. A bike like in #23 will be a hazard on any real singletrack. #7 and #13 know what they are talking about. If you want to mountain bike get a hardtail. Anything less will be a gimped experience. However, if you're talking about riding on flat, wide, hard packed dirt or gravel trails get a hybrid.
25
#25
0 Frags +

if youre mainly just commuting its not a bad idea to purchase a fixie. you'll save a lot on maintenance because theres only one gear. shifters and derailleurs are the most problematic and hard to fix parts on a bike. everything else is easy enough to make sense of yourself. also most fixie's come with a singlespeed so you can switch back and forth if you want.

crossbikes are good for offroad and road, but not rooty and rocky trails. its also hard to find an extremely cheap one of those.

but id ride the free mtn bike and if you get more into it, craigslist is your best friend. you just gotta keep looking, you'll be amazed what you can find.

if youre mainly just commuting its not a bad idea to purchase a fixie. you'll save a lot on maintenance because theres only one gear. shifters and derailleurs are the most problematic and hard to fix parts on a bike. everything else is easy enough to make sense of yourself. also most fixie's come with a singlespeed so you can switch back and forth if you want.

crossbikes are good for offroad and road, but not rooty and rocky trails. its also hard to find an extremely cheap one of those.

but id ride the free mtn bike and if you get more into it, craigslist is your best friend. you just gotta keep looking, you'll be amazed what you can find.
26
#26
3 Frags +
femmebruleeI second the option for a Hybrid bike. I purchased mine in 2007 and it's still wonderful, it's a Gary Fisher Zebrano (owned by Trek, I think I spent about $500? for it) and what I like most is that it's a hybrid with front suspension that you can lock or unlock. It's PERFECT for basic commute biking or dirt trails, the wheels are slightly wider than road bikes but not as bulky and heavy as mountain tires.

I picked it out and was fitted at a local bike shop, which was great because they also provided me free maintenance for a couple years after the purchase.

https://bicyclebluebook.blob.core.windows.net/zoom/gf_zebgs_09_z.jpg

Also check out: http://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/recommended/17-for-2017-the-best-fitness-and-hybrid-bikes-of-2017/slide/16

everything about this bike makes me cringe. the seat post suspension in particular is killing me.
best case it does nothing, worst case, it throws you off the bike.

[quote=femmebrulee]I second the option for a Hybrid bike. I purchased mine in 2007 and it's still wonderful, it's a Gary Fisher Zebrano (owned by Trek, I think I spent about $500? for it) and what I like most is that it's a hybrid with front suspension that you can lock or unlock. It's PERFECT for basic commute biking or dirt trails, the wheels are slightly wider than road bikes but not as bulky and heavy as mountain tires.

I picked it out and was fitted at a local bike shop, which was great because they also provided me free maintenance for a couple years after the purchase.

[img]https://bicyclebluebook.blob.core.windows.net/zoom/gf_zebgs_09_z.jpg[/img]

Also check out: http://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/recommended/17-for-2017-the-best-fitness-and-hybrid-bikes-of-2017/slide/16[/quote]
everything about this bike makes me cringe. the seat post suspension in particular is killing me.
best case it does nothing, worst case, it throws you off the bike.
27
#27
1 Frags +

https://i.imgur.com/4SzzYBr.jpg

Here's a picture of the bike. So far the only big issue is that the back tire most likely has a puncture and i have to blow it up every time i use the bike. Gonna get a repair kit and fix that. Other than that the gearing has 3 on the left and 7 on the right. A bit strange to get the hold of but I can live with it. Might be a full suspension as well, i dont really know the difference that well but theres springs for the front and back tires so thats p sick

kinda a shitty picture myb

[img]https://i.imgur.com/4SzzYBr.jpg[/img]
Here's a picture of the bike. So far the only big issue is that the back tire most likely has a puncture and i have to blow it up every time i use the bike. Gonna get a repair kit and fix that. Other than that the gearing has 3 on the left and 7 on the right. A bit strange to get the hold of but I can live with it. Might be a full suspension as well, i dont really know the difference that well but theres springs for the front and back tires so thats p sick


kinda a shitty picture myb
28
#28
1 Frags +

That's full suspension, a hardtail wouldn't have suspension on the back hence the name hard tail.

You can look up how the gearing works on 21 speed mountain bikes or just play around and get a feel for what works best at what inclines, etc.

That's full suspension, a hardtail wouldn't have suspension on the back hence the name hard tail.

You can look up how the gearing works on 21 speed mountain bikes or just play around and get a feel for what works best at what inclines, etc.
29
#29
2 Frags +

Cool bike! here's what i would do to make it the most hassle free and best riding. lose the stand - its pointless. make sure the seat is easily adjustable, so its not too tight - you want to be able to shift it around while you are riding, a good rule of thumb is high for up and low for down. the reasons are when the seat is high you have more rotation and a higher pivot point in the legs making climbing easier and a low seat for riding downhill allows for a lower center of gravity and more movement on the bike. make sure the tires have a good amount of air in them, a track pump is a good way to find out this or a bike pump + a gauge, i normally have around 30 psi when i am riding technical and mud and nearer 40 psi for rock. tire pressure isnt a big issue but tires too soft will result in pinch flats and potential rim damage and to hard and you will just bounce everywhere. ideally you would buy a new stem ( the bit that connects the bars to the frame) as that one isnt ideal for mountain biking- you want a low one to give maximum control with minimal distance. check the brake pads, if its a second hand bike its a good chance that they are worn and you definitely dont want them to give out on ya- just whip out the wheels and look in where the brake disc runs. it should be pretty obvious if they are worn on not but a good thing to look for is and metal on metal, the brake pads sit on top of a metal plate which you dont want to touch the disc. DO NOT PULL ON THE BRAKE LEVER EVER IF THERE IS NO DISC IN THE BRAKE it causes a minor fuck up and requires dumb amounts of jiggling and realigning to fix.

Cool bike! here's what i would do to make it the most hassle free and best riding. lose the stand - its pointless. make sure the seat is easily adjustable, so its not too tight - you want to be able to shift it around while you are riding, a good rule of thumb is high for up and low for down. the reasons are when the seat is high you have more rotation and a higher pivot point in the legs making climbing easier and a low seat for riding downhill allows for a lower center of gravity and more movement on the bike. make sure the tires have a good amount of air in them, a track pump is a good way to find out this or a bike pump + a gauge, i normally have around 30 psi when i am riding technical and mud and nearer 40 psi for rock. tire pressure isnt a big issue but tires too soft will result in pinch flats and potential rim damage and to hard and you will just bounce everywhere. ideally you would buy a new stem ( the bit that connects the bars to the frame) as that one isnt ideal for mountain biking- you want a low one to give maximum control with minimal distance. check the brake pads, if its a second hand bike its a good chance that they are worn and you definitely dont want them to give out on ya- just whip out the wheels and look in where the brake disc runs. it should be pretty obvious if they are worn on not but a good thing to look for is and metal on metal, the brake pads sit on top of a metal plate which you dont want to touch the disc. DO NOT PULL ON THE BRAKE LEVER EVER IF THERE IS NO DISC IN THE BRAKE it causes a minor fuck up and requires dumb amounts of jiggling and realigning to fix.
30
#30
0 Frags +

just bought this, kind of feel like I was gayed by it being "ready to ride" for +$50 because I'll have to tune it and all anyways but my cousin said it was the right thing to do b/c having a shop do the majority of the build would cost more

just bought [url=https://tommasobikes.com/products/illimitate?variant=16464699846#]this[/url], kind of feel like I was gayed by it being "ready to ride" for +$50 because I'll have to tune it and all anyways but my cousin said it was the right thing to do b/c having a shop do the majority of the build would cost more
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