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Majors and jobs and stuffs
posted in Off Topic
31
#31
2 Frags +

Majored in Information Systems with a Business minor. A few years out of college, and I'm working as an Automated Test Engineer for a large clothing retailer.

My only advice to anyone going into programming is be very weary of joining any sort of small company or startup early in your career. They tend to only focus on output and the bottom line. When in reality, it would be ideal to look for a company that allows you to develop your skills as a developer.

Majored in Information Systems with a Business minor. A few years out of college, and I'm working as an Automated Test Engineer for a large clothing retailer.

My only advice to anyone going into programming is be very weary of joining any sort of small company or startup early in your career. They tend to only focus on output and the bottom line. When in reality, it would be ideal to look for a company that allows you to develop your skills as a developer.
32
#32
10 Frags +

dropped out to become a computer janitor

dropped out to become a computer janitor
33
#33
2 Frags +

law school

law school
34
#34
0 Frags +

I was majoring in computer/electrical engineering, but I have no clue what to do anymore D:

I was majoring in computer/electrical engineering, but I have no clue what to do anymore D:
35
#35
2 Frags +

I'm majoring in Animation-Illustration, with an emphasis in Storyboarding/Visual Development. It's my last semester of 6 years of school!

I'm majoring in Animation-Illustration, with an emphasis in Storyboarding/Visual Development. It's my last semester of 6 years of school!
36
#36
-3 Frags +
noniscomputer science, just got admitted to grad school! :D

Grad school for CS? If so, why?

[quote=nonis]computer science, just got admitted to grad school! :D[/quote]
Grad school for CS? If so, why?
37
#37
0 Frags +

Computer Information Systems major chiming in. I went into Computer Networking and am on my way to becoming a Certified Ethical Hacker. Everything I learned, I learned in the real world experience and by acquiring certifications. I don't feel like my college education taught me crap.

My advice to anyone in college right now: Take on internships! Start building real world experience as soon as possible.

Computer Information Systems major chiming in. I went into Computer Networking and am on my way to becoming a Certified Ethical Hacker. Everything I learned, I learned in the real world experience and by acquiring certifications. I don't feel like my college education taught me crap.

My advice to anyone in college right now: Take on internships! Start building real world experience as soon as possible.
38
#38
2 Frags +
Teapot_If you're gonna do physics please make absolutely sure that you like and are comfortable with maths. I don't know what the american high schools are like but in the UK you use very little of the maths that is critical for physics in your final years of physics classes - there was almost no calculus involved and was almost avoided in my case.

The maths gets taught separately in your maths classes sure, but a lot of people go into uni wanting to do physics with their naive understanding from what they've done in school and then get blown away by the amount of maths required.

- 2nd year physics undergrad

Yeah at the higher levels of physics, it's a TON of math. You should be really comfortable with differential equations, and certain concepts from calc 2/3 (fourier analysis, etc.), and for some reason NONE of my classes ever taught any complex algebra (working with the imaginary number, i), which is super useful when you're dealing with wave equations which comes up all the time in quantum physics.

[quote=Teapot_]If you're gonna do physics please make absolutely sure that you like and are comfortable with maths. I don't know what the american high schools are like but in the UK you use very little of the maths that is critical for physics in your final years of physics classes - there was almost no calculus involved and was almost avoided in my case.

The maths gets taught separately in your maths classes sure, but a lot of people go into uni wanting to do physics with their naive understanding from what they've done in school and then get blown away by the amount of maths required.

- 2nd year physics undergrad[/quote]

Yeah at the higher levels of physics, it's a TON of math. You should be really comfortable with differential equations, and certain concepts from calc 2/3 (fourier analysis, etc.), and for some reason NONE of my classes ever taught any complex algebra (working with the imaginary number, i), which is super useful when you're dealing with wave equations which comes up all the time in quantum physics.
39
#39
3 Frags +

im really considering a military career. does anyone have any experience in this field? if i went down this path i would probably go into the marines(surprise surprise).

im really considering a military career. does anyone have any experience in this field? if i went down this path i would probably go into the marines(surprise surprise).
40
#40
-1 Frags +

ayy i just quit my job at kroger and my sister walked into my room an hour ago and offered me a job at a golf course (shes head chef at the course restaraunt) so theres that

ayy i just quit my job at kroger and my sister walked into my room an hour ago and offered me a job at a golf course (shes head chef at the course restaraunt) so theres that
41
#41
1 Frags +

I graduated in Maths + Philosophy and will start a grad job as a consultant in sept, after dealing with the joy of grad schemes

If you do a stem subject, you'll probably be fine in life (in the UK I guess, can't speak for anywhere else)

I graduated in Maths + Philosophy and will start a grad job as a consultant in sept, after dealing with the joy of grad schemes

If you do a stem subject, you'll probably be fine in life (in the UK I guess, can't speak for anywhere else)
42
#42
2 Frags +
SAAM_looking to get into nursing, starting college next year

Great career path - if you run into any issues/questions down the road let me know (I've been an RN for 3+ years now)

If anyone else here is thinking about the medical field and has questions, feel free to ask.

[quote=SAAM_]looking to get into nursing, starting college next year[/quote]

Great career path - if you run into any issues/questions down the road let me know (I've been an RN for 3+ years now)

If anyone else here is thinking about the medical field and has questions, feel free to ask.
43
#43
0 Frags +

I'm graduating in a couple years with a BBA specializing in finance. Gonna try to get into investment banking, risk management, financial planning, or similar.

blazeitOne more year to go to college, i want to be a physicist. Physics really interests me. Does anyone here know what it is to be a physicist?

Unless you want to be confined to academia, get a B.Sc. or B.Eng. instead.

I'm graduating in a couple years with a BBA specializing in finance. Gonna try to get into investment banking, risk management, financial planning, or similar.
[quote=blazeit]One more year to go to college, i want to be a physicist. Physics really interests me. Does anyone here know what it is to be a physicist?[/quote]
Unless you want to be confined to academia, get a B.Sc. or B.Eng. instead.
44
#44
0 Frags +
Teapot_If you're gonna do physics please make absolutely sure that you like and are comfortable with maths. I don't know what the american high schools are like but in the UK you use very little of the maths that is critical for physics in your final years of physics classes - there was almost no calculus involved and was almost avoided in my case.

The maths gets taught separately in your maths classes sure, but a lot of people go into uni wanting to do physics with their naive understanding from what they've done in school and then get blown away by the amount of maths required.

- 2nd year physics undergrad

I know American education is seen as a joke, but I'm pretty sure AP math and physics are very calc intensive.

[quote=Teapot_]If you're gonna do physics please make absolutely sure that you like and are comfortable with maths. I don't know what the american high schools are like but in the UK you use very little of the maths that is critical for physics in your final years of physics classes - there was almost no calculus involved and was almost avoided in my case.

The maths gets taught separately in your maths classes sure, but a lot of people go into uni wanting to do physics with their naive understanding from what they've done in school and then get blown away by the amount of maths required.

- 2nd year physics undergrad[/quote]
I know American education is seen as a joke, but I'm pretty sure AP math and physics are very calc intensive.
45
#45
0 Frags +

Looking into being an electrical engineer under the field of computer architecture, designing CPUs and GPUs. I originally wanted to do programming but got bored of it pretty fast. Not sure in terms of a second choice but I'm still young. Lately I've been pretty interested in politics and economics so idk.

Looking into being an electrical engineer under the field of computer architecture, designing CPUs and GPUs. I originally wanted to do programming but got bored of it pretty fast. Not sure in terms of a second choice but I'm still young. Lately I've been pretty interested in politics and economics so idk.
46
#46
0 Frags +
potI know American education is seen as a joke, but I'm pretty sure AP math and physics are very calc intensive.

Like I said I dont know what you guys do for physics in american high schools, just something to note if you want to study physics and are in high school right now - especially if you're studying a british syllabus.

[quote=pot]I know American education is seen as a joke, but I'm pretty sure AP math and physics are very calc intensive.[/quote]

Like I said I dont know what you guys do for physics in american high schools, just something to note if you want to study physics and are in high school right now - especially if you're studying a british syllabus.
47
#47
4 Frags +
blazeitOne more year to go to college, i want to be a physicist. Physics really interests me. Does anyone here know what it is to be a physicist?

Oh fantastic! I'm currently in my last year of physics (though I'm doing another year to finish a math double major after this one) and going to grad school for physics, hopefully going all the way to Ph.D. It's perfect for me since I want to do teaching, but I understand it isn't for everyone.

First things, gotta master calculus. I mean MASTER it as much as you can, go more in depth than your class might require because if it becomes second nature to you, it makes everything far more manageable. It doesn't matter if you're not a "math person," work hard at it and make sure you have a grasp on it. I don't consider myself especially great at math, but I'm diligent and do lots of practice in my off time which leads me to have a very strong grasp on the math required. And never stop learning math. My physics program lacks a lot of math that I think is essential, so I constantly check out books at my school's library (textbooks are amazing resources) to improve my knowledge of math and science. Lots of Ivy League schools have lots of lectures online, be sure to use those to your advantage. Another valuable resource is the science subreddits, though the ones I found most helpful are /r/askscience, /r/physics, /r/askphysics, /r/math, and /r/askmath. PhysicsForums is also wonderful to nudge you in the right direction without giving away the solution to problems. And talk to your professors. A lot. Even if you don't need help with the lessons, challenge yourself. Give yourself harder problems. Don't be okay with "trust me on this one" when it comes to proofs, try and figure out WHERE equations come from. Follow their logic, and it'll be so much simpler to deal with when you have problems come up.

Second, figure out all your school's resources they have available. I absolutely LOVELOVELOVE ScienceDirect, helps a ton to find lots of research papers. Speaking of which, learn how to read research papers. They're incredibly interesting to read. Also, get some research done with a professor. Figure out what branch of physics you wanna dip your feet into, though it might take a while for you to figure it out. For a long time, I thought mine was general relativity but I'm far happier doing research in biophysics than I ever was with GR.

Most importantly, don't confine yourself to physics. Learn chemistry, biology, philosophy, etc. It's really easy to focus entirely on your major especially if you're incredibly passionate about it, but you might find that a related field might interest you far more.

Feel free to add me if you have any questions. I don't really like helping with homeworks but I'll definitely answer any questions you might have about the physics field.

[quote=blazeit]One more year to go to college, i want to be a physicist. Physics really interests me. Does anyone here know what it is to be a physicist?[/quote]

Oh fantastic! I'm currently in my last year of physics (though I'm doing another year to finish a math double major after this one) and going to grad school for physics, hopefully going all the way to Ph.D. It's perfect for me since I want to do teaching, but I understand it isn't for everyone.

First things, gotta master calculus. I mean MASTER it as much as you can, go more in depth than your class might require because if it becomes second nature to you, it makes everything far more manageable. It doesn't matter if you're not a "math person," work hard at it and make sure you have a grasp on it. I don't consider myself especially great at math, but I'm diligent and do lots of practice in my off time which leads me to have a very strong grasp on the math required. And never stop learning math. My physics program lacks a lot of math that I think is essential, so I constantly check out books at my school's library (textbooks are amazing resources) to improve my knowledge of math and science. Lots of Ivy League schools have lots of lectures online, be sure to use those to your advantage. Another valuable resource is the science subreddits, though the ones I found most helpful are /r/askscience, /r/physics, /r/askphysics, /r/math, and /r/askmath. PhysicsForums is also wonderful to nudge you in the right direction without giving away the solution to problems. And talk to your professors. A lot. Even if you don't need help with the lessons, challenge yourself. Give yourself harder problems. Don't be okay with "trust me on this one" when it comes to proofs, try and figure out WHERE equations come from. Follow their logic, and it'll be so much simpler to deal with when you have problems come up.

Second, figure out all your school's resources they have available. I absolutely LOVELOVELOVE ScienceDirect, helps a ton to find lots of research papers. Speaking of which, learn how to read research papers. They're incredibly interesting to read. Also, get some research done with a professor. Figure out what branch of physics you wanna dip your feet into, though it might take a while for you to figure it out. For a long time, I thought mine was general relativity but I'm far happier doing research in biophysics than I ever was with GR.

Most importantly, don't confine yourself to physics. Learn chemistry, biology, philosophy, etc. It's really easy to focus entirely on your major especially if you're incredibly passionate about it, but you might find that a related field might interest you far more.

Feel free to add me if you have any questions. I don't really like helping with homeworks but I'll definitely answer any questions you might have about the physics field.
48
#48
0 Frags +
RawrSpoonMost importantly, don't confine yourself to physics. Learn chemistry, biology, philosophy, etc. It's really easy to focus entirely on your major especially if you're incredibly passionate about it, but you might find that a related field might interest you far more.

Definitely this. I'm in a class this semester called Nonlinear Dynamics & Chaos Theory, which is cross-listed as PHYS/BIO/CHEM/MATH, and it's be fascinating to see all the applications that pervade multiple fields of study.

[quote=RawrSpoon]
Most importantly, don't confine yourself to physics. Learn chemistry, biology, philosophy, etc. It's really easy to focus entirely on your major especially if you're incredibly passionate about it, but you might find that a related field might interest you far more.
[/quote]

Definitely this. I'm in a class this semester called Nonlinear Dynamics & Chaos Theory, which is cross-listed as PHYS/BIO/CHEM/MATH, and it's be fascinating to see all the applications that pervade multiple fields of study.
49
#49
0 Frags +
RawrSpoonblazeitOne more year to go to college, i want to be a physicist. Physics really interests me. Does anyone here know what it is to be a physicist?
Oh fantastic! I'm currently in my last year of physics (though I'm doing another year to finish a math double major after this one) and going to grad school for physics, hopefully going all the way to Ph.D. It's perfect for me since I want to do teaching, but I understand it isn't for everyone.

First things, gotta master calculus. I mean MASTER it as much as you can, go more in depth than your class might require because if it becomes second nature to you, it makes everything far more manageable. It doesn't matter if you're not a "math person," work hard at it and make sure you have a grasp on it. I don't consider myself especially great at math, but I'm diligent and do lots of practice in my off time which leads me to have a very strong grasp on the math required. And never stop learning math. My physics program lacks a lot of math that I think is essential, so I constantly check out books at my school's library (textbooks are amazing resources) to improve my knowledge of math and science. Lots of Ivy League schools have lots of lectures online, be sure to use those to your advantage. Another valuable resource is the science subreddits, though the ones I found most helpful are /r/askscience, /r/physics, /r/askphysics, /r/math, and /r/askmath. PhysicsForums is also wonderful to nudge you in the right direction without giving away the solution to problems. And talk to your professors. A lot. Even if you don't need help with the lessons, challenge yourself. Give yourself harder problems. Don't be okay with "trust me on this one" when it comes to proofs, try and figure out WHERE equations come from. Follow their logic, and it'll be so much simpler to deal with when you have problems come up.

Second, figure out all your school's resources they have available. I absolutely LOVELOVELOVE ScienceDirect, helps a ton to find lots of research papers. Speaking of which, learn how to read research papers. They're incredibly interesting to read. Also, get some research done with a professor. Figure out what branch of physics you wanna dip your feet into, though it might take a while for you to figure it out. For a long time, I thought mine was general relativity but I'm far happier doing research in biophysics than I ever was with GR.

Most importantly, don't confine yourself to physics. Learn chemistry, biology, philosophy, etc. It's really easy to focus entirely on your major especially if you're incredibly passionate about it, but you might find that a related field might interest you far more.

Feel free to add me if you have any questions. I don't really like helping with homeworks but I'll definitely answer any questions you might have about the physics field.

Thanks. Yes, i will put more attention in calculus starting from now. I'm good in algebra and calculus based on my syllabus and grades. I watch a lot of MIT and KhanAcademy videos too. They are better than my teacher's lectures who is honestly not good. He confuses me more. I dont like chemistry, biology, too much to remember. I like organic which is slightly logical but inorganic is just a mess. Im sure im most interested in physics. Ill try reading research papers, i find them a bit tough to understand. Thanks man

[quote=RawrSpoon][quote=blazeit]One more year to go to college, i want to be a physicist. Physics really interests me. Does anyone here know what it is to be a physicist?[/quote]

Oh fantastic! I'm currently in my last year of physics (though I'm doing another year to finish a math double major after this one) and going to grad school for physics, hopefully going all the way to Ph.D. It's perfect for me since I want to do teaching, but I understand it isn't for everyone.

First things, gotta master calculus. I mean MASTER it as much as you can, go more in depth than your class might require because if it becomes second nature to you, it makes everything far more manageable. It doesn't matter if you're not a "math person," work hard at it and make sure you have a grasp on it. I don't consider myself especially great at math, but I'm diligent and do lots of practice in my off time which leads me to have a very strong grasp on the math required. And never stop learning math. My physics program lacks a lot of math that I think is essential, so I constantly check out books at my school's library (textbooks are amazing resources) to improve my knowledge of math and science. Lots of Ivy League schools have lots of lectures online, be sure to use those to your advantage. Another valuable resource is the science subreddits, though the ones I found most helpful are /r/askscience, /r/physics, /r/askphysics, /r/math, and /r/askmath. PhysicsForums is also wonderful to nudge you in the right direction without giving away the solution to problems. And talk to your professors. A lot. Even if you don't need help with the lessons, challenge yourself. Give yourself harder problems. Don't be okay with "trust me on this one" when it comes to proofs, try and figure out WHERE equations come from. Follow their logic, and it'll be so much simpler to deal with when you have problems come up.

Second, figure out all your school's resources they have available. I absolutely LOVELOVELOVE ScienceDirect, helps a ton to find lots of research papers. Speaking of which, learn how to read research papers. They're incredibly interesting to read. Also, get some research done with a professor. Figure out what branch of physics you wanna dip your feet into, though it might take a while for you to figure it out. For a long time, I thought mine was general relativity but I'm far happier doing research in biophysics than I ever was with GR.

Most importantly, don't confine yourself to physics. Learn chemistry, biology, philosophy, etc. It's really easy to focus entirely on your major especially if you're incredibly passionate about it, but you might find that a related field might interest you far more.

Feel free to add me if you have any questions. I don't really like helping with homeworks but I'll definitely answer any questions you might have about the physics field.[/quote]
Thanks. Yes, i will put more attention in calculus starting from now. I'm good in algebra and calculus based on my syllabus and grades. I watch a lot of MIT and KhanAcademy videos too. They are better than my teacher's lectures who is honestly not good. He confuses me more. I dont like chemistry, biology, too much to remember. I like organic which is slightly logical but inorganic is just a mess. Im sure im most interested in physics. Ill try reading research papers, i find them a bit tough to understand. Thanks man
50
#50
0 Frags +

Finishing up my first year in Computer Science. Was initially going to study music but there wasn't enough money in it.
But I actually have two teaching jobs for music at local highschools so it ended up working out.

A little bit unorthodox for now but it's nice having a cool job to work during university that isn't retail or fast food that also looks really good on paper.

Finishing up my first year in Computer Science. Was initially going to study music but there wasn't enough money in it.
But I actually have two teaching jobs for music at local highschools so it ended up working out.

A little bit unorthodox for now but it's nice having a cool job to work during university that isn't retail or fast food that also looks really good on paper.
51
#51
-7 Frags +

i am a chaotic neutral rogue/theif and make way more than the shitty neet losers on this site

i am a chaotic neutral rogue/theif and make way more than the shitty neet losers on this site
52
#52
1 Frags +

accounting major

graduating next spring

looking forward to the grind

accounting major

graduating next spring

looking forward to the grind
53
#53
1 Frags +

Second year computer science. Really interested in cogsci, specifically AI lately.

Second year computer science. Really interested in cogsci, specifically AI lately.
54
#54
0 Frags +
kevaccounting major

graduating next spring

looking forward to the grind

Good luck on your CPA! I hear it's a bitch.

[quote=kev]accounting major

graduating next spring

looking forward to the grind[/quote]

Good luck on your CPA! I hear it's a bitch.
55
#55
0 Frags +
ddrsensationkevaccounting major

graduating next spring

looking forward to the grind

Good luck on your CPA! I hear it's a bitch.

thanks, gonna need it
i heard they are gonna change the exam soon too

[quote=ddrsensation][quote=kev]accounting major

graduating next spring

looking forward to the grind[/quote]

Good luck on your CPA! I hear it's a bitch.[/quote]

thanks, gonna need it
i heard they are gonna change the exam soon too
56
#56
2 Frags +

Finishing up my junior year in aerospace engineering, work part time as a dispatcher and had a co-op as a mechanical engineer working on sounding rockets

plan on getting a job as an engineer for a few years then getting an MBA and moving more into project management than engineering

Finishing up my junior year in aerospace engineering, work part time as a dispatcher and had a co-op as a mechanical engineer working on sounding rockets

plan on getting a job as an engineer for a few years then getting an MBA and moving more into project management than engineering
57
#57
0 Frags +

I got my BA in English Lit a long time ago. Now I'm a corporate stooge.

I got my BA in English Lit a long time ago. Now I'm a corporate stooge.
58
#58
0 Frags +

I major in poli sci at amherst college

poverty here I come

I major in poli sci at amherst college

poverty here I come
59
#59
0 Frags +

After doing a study for a year I totally didn't like, I quit after last summer, going to start a study to become a silversmith after the summer, anyone any experience with that?

After doing a study for a year I totally didn't like, I quit after last summer, going to start a study to become a silversmith after the summer, anyone any experience with that?
60
#60
0 Frags +
Teapot_potI know American education is seen as a joke, but I'm pretty sure AP math and physics are very calc intensive.
Like I said I dont know what you guys do for physics in american high schools, just something to note if you want to study physics and are in high school right now - especially if you're studying a british syllabus.

I've known my fair share of physics majors at various college/universities and I totally agree with you. Physics at top engineering and liberal arts schools can be quite intense. I'm not sure what you'd get from a lower-ranked state school, especially since early Physics classics can be made either really easy or really hard.

[quote=Teapot_][quote=pot]I know American education is seen as a joke, but I'm pretty sure AP math and physics are very calc intensive.[/quote]

Like I said I dont know what you guys do for physics in american high schools, just something to note if you want to study physics and are in high school right now - especially if you're studying a british syllabus.[/quote]

I've known my fair share of physics majors at various college/universities and I totally agree with you. Physics at top engineering and liberal arts schools can be quite intense. I'm not sure what you'd get from a lower-ranked state school, especially since early Physics classics can be made either really easy or really hard.
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