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Formers smokers
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31
#31
14 Frags +

I quit smoking on January the 4th 2013 and it was the best decision of my life. I know exactly what you mean as it was exactly the same for me. People don't realise how much of a downer being a smoker that wants to quit can put on your life and some people have no idea how hard it is to stop. Anyway, I'll try and explain how I managed to pull it off. This might be a typical Arx essay.

Firstly, my quit date. I didn't actually decide in advance when I wanted to quit. I could lie and say that I didn't want to quit on January 1st because it's too mainstream (oh|so|cool). Simply put, I walked out of work at 5:30pm on a Friday and decided this would be the moment. I through my cigarettes and lighter into a bush and stopped right there. Around 8 seconds later I was so desperate for a smoke, but anyway... that's where it started.

Before this moment, I had done a lot of 'prep'. Firstly, I had wanted to quit for a long time. I had tried methods such as nicotine gum, patches, and the most enjoyable of all, e-cigs. Electronic cigarettes are great, but they are simply an alternative to smoking (they are fun, and a great hobby and quite an effective substitute). I wanted to not have my life dictated by a nicotine addiction. That was my biggest problem. To give some non-smokers a sense of how powerful this addiction is... if a true soul mate of mine asked me to drive to the shop at 11pm on a weekday to get her some chocolate, I'd probably question it and make an excuse to not go, but if I'd run out of cigarettes, I'd walk 3 miles down to the nearest garage at 3am in rain or snow to pick up a pack.

After a number of quit attempts I decided to do a bit of research about smoking and addictions in general. I realised there's two parts to smoking that need to be beaten:

1) The addiction
2) The habit.

To break the nicotine addiction, I needed to understand it. Now it doesn't matter if this is exactly correct or not, the principle still applies.

Your body has nicotine in its blood. When the amount of nicotine drops below a certain level, your body craves more and pesters you to go and top it up. Once you've hit that satisfied nicotine level, your body will stop bothering your nicotine level will slowly start dropping again.

It takes 72 hours for all nicotine to leave your body (meaning the level hits 0). As soon as your nicotine level hits zero, your body will start to forget what nicotine even is. I'll tell you what this means in real terms. This is the important part.

If you go 72 hours without putting any form of nicotine in your body (no gum, no ecigs, not a quick pull on a friend's cigerette), your body will start to gradually forget what nicotine is. When your body starts to forget, the addiction becomes MUCH easier to manage and your battle becomes with your smoking habit rather than the addiction. If you have even a single pull on a cigarette, or a nicotine gum, or use an ecig, you will be putting nicotine back into your body. This means your body will remember and will now really start to bother you so that you top it back up to that nicotine level that it desires.

Simply put... survive 72 hours without nicotine and you're half way to quitting. 72 hours of absolute hell. After that.. no more nicotine.. ever. Not even the SMALLEST amount, because as I mentioned, if you have anything at all... your body will tell you to get it back up to the desired level. If you have 0 nicotine in your blood, that's when the healing process starts. One pull means another 72 hours of hell. You're back at the beginning.

The habit was hard to beat. After doing something for so long it becomes your way of life. I would have a routine where I would wake up and almost immediately have a smoke. It took several weeks to break this routine. Every single morning when I woke up, the reaction embedded in my brain was to look on my desk for my tobacco. When it wasn't there, I'd get frustrated, but gradually this association would be altered. That's the next phase of quitting... breaking the associations with smoking.

Having a beer? Oooh I'd like a smoke!
After dinner? Ohh yes please, light me up!
Walking somewhere or waiting for something? Oh go on then... just one!
Smoke breaks at work? I'll meet you outside!

These are all day-to-day associations with smoking and there's only one way to change them and that is by replacing them. You're changing your routine and eventually your new routine will be one without a cigarette in your hand. You don't need to go find a ball to play with, or chew a gum or anything. It doesn't actually matter what you do, but the more times you experience these association moments and don't have a cigarette, the easier it will be next time you encounter it.

So now cravings and anger.

Oh my god. The stress and anger when quitting. In those first 72 hours, I wanted to kill a guy for driving round the wrong way into a McDonalds car park. It wasn't even the action of driving the wrong way... it was the smug look on his face when I signaled to him that he was going the wrong way, and he gestured as if to say, "Meh, I don't really care...". It's lucky my car windows didn't work or I'd have shouted so much abuse at the guy over something so trivial (he wasn't even in my way).

The thing about the stress and anger of smoking, is that having a smoke becomes your 'go to' when you're stressed about something and there's a huge concern that when you quit, you will not have this method of release. Sure, that is true while your addicted to nicotine but actually, once you've broken it, you find that you get less stressed at things and more importantly, you get stressed for less time. What happens when you're a smoker, is you get mad about something and you stay mad at it until you've had a smoke. When you're a non-smoker, you get mad about something and then you get over it much faster (probably about the same time as it takes a smoker to grab their lighter and light up). The difference is if a smoker doesn't have a smoke... they will stay mad about it until they do.

As for the cravings. They get much easier over time, but it isn't as quick as you might like.

When I quit, I wanted to smoke every hour.... in fact every 30 minutes! It was sooooooo hard! Especially in those first 72 hours, but honestly, just assume those first 72 hours will be absolute hell and that you will constantly want to smoke, kill everyone you meet and generally hate the world.

So what about afterwards? Well here's the time scales I'd say I got really strong cravings (the kind you actually had to fight against).

First 72 hours: Constantly. Be a warrior.

After the first week: Randomly 10 times a day (plus one for every regular association).

Weeks 2 - 4: Maybe 4 or 5 a day (plus a mild one for every regular association).

After the first month: Around 2 a day, but most regular associations at this point has been broken).

After 3 months: A couple every week.

After 6 months: Maybe once a week.

After a year: Maybe once a month.

After a year and a half: Hmmm I can't remember my last one. I think I just had a thought of "Oh, it would be nice to enjoy a smoke right now!" but that was about it.

The key is that if you have some nicotine, you're probably going back to step one. If you're lucky you might only go back a few steps but it's not worth the risk. Quitting smoking is so fucking hard that you wouldn't want to move backwards and put yourself through that previous step ever again. That's my motivation for not even trying it again. I'm curious to see how my body would react if I had one... but what if it resets me back to step 1? All that hard work gone. Fuck that.

Treat it like a game. You have a 72 hour grind ahead of you. It's going to suck so much, but it's a challenge. Thrive on it. Once you get through those 72 hours, you will be in a much better place to decide if you can continue.. but you won't want to go back.

I quit smoking on January the 4th 2013 and it was the best decision of my life. I know exactly what you mean as it was exactly the same for me. People don't realise how much of a downer being a smoker that wants to quit can put on your life and some people have no idea how hard it is to stop. Anyway, I'll try and explain how I managed to pull it off. This might be a typical Arx essay.

Firstly, my quit date. I didn't actually decide in advance when I wanted to quit. I could lie and say that I didn't want to quit on January 1st because it's too mainstream (oh|so|cool). Simply put, I walked out of work at 5:30pm on a Friday and decided this would be the moment. I through my cigarettes and lighter into a bush and stopped right there. Around 8 seconds later I was so desperate for a smoke, but anyway... that's where it started.

Before this moment, I had done a lot of 'prep'. Firstly, I had wanted to quit for a long time. I had tried methods such as nicotine gum, patches, and the most enjoyable of all, e-cigs. Electronic cigarettes are great, but they are simply an alternative to smoking (they are fun, and a great hobby and quite an effective substitute). I wanted to not have my life dictated by a nicotine addiction. That was my biggest problem. To give some non-smokers a sense of how powerful this addiction is... if a true soul mate of mine asked me to drive to the shop at 11pm on a weekday to get her some chocolate, I'd probably question it and make an excuse to not go, but if I'd run out of cigarettes, I'd walk 3 miles down to the nearest garage at 3am in rain or snow to pick up a pack.

After a number of quit attempts I decided to do a bit of research about smoking and addictions in general. I realised there's two parts to smoking that need to be beaten:

1) The addiction
2) The habit.

To break the nicotine addiction, I needed to understand it. Now it doesn't matter if this is exactly correct or not, the principle still applies.

Your body has nicotine in its blood. When the amount of nicotine drops below a certain level, your body craves more and pesters you to go and top it up. Once you've hit that satisfied nicotine level, your body will stop bothering your nicotine level will slowly start dropping again.

It takes 72 hours for all nicotine to leave your body (meaning the level hits 0). As soon as your nicotine level hits zero, your body will start to forget what nicotine even is. I'll tell you what this means in real terms. [b]This is the important part[/b].

If you go 72 hours without putting any form of nicotine in your body (no gum, no ecigs, not a quick pull on a friend's cigerette), your body will start to gradually forget what nicotine is. When your body starts to forget, the addiction becomes MUCH easier to manage and your battle becomes with your smoking habit rather than the addiction. If you have even a single pull on a cigarette, or a nicotine gum, or use an ecig, you will be putting nicotine back into your body. This means your body will remember and will now really start to bother you so that you top it back up to that nicotine level that it desires.

Simply put... survive 72 hours without nicotine and you're half way to quitting. 72 hours of absolute hell. After that.. no more nicotine.. ever. Not even the SMALLEST amount, because as I mentioned, if you have anything at all... your body will tell you to get it back up to the desired level. If you have 0 nicotine in your blood, that's when the healing process starts. One pull means another 72 hours of hell. You're back at the beginning.

The habit was hard to beat. After doing something for so long it becomes your way of life. I would have a routine where I would wake up and almost immediately have a smoke. It took several weeks to break this routine. Every single morning when I woke up, the reaction embedded in my brain was to look on my desk for my tobacco. When it wasn't there, I'd get frustrated, but gradually this association would be altered. That's the next phase of quitting... breaking the associations with smoking.

Having a beer? Oooh I'd like a smoke!
After dinner? Ohh yes please, light me up!
Walking somewhere or waiting for something? Oh go on then... just one!
Smoke breaks at work? I'll meet you outside!

These are all day-to-day associations with smoking and there's only one way to change them and that is by replacing them. You're changing your routine and eventually your new routine will be one without a cigarette in your hand. You don't need to go find a ball to play with, or chew a gum or anything. It doesn't actually matter what you do, but the more times you experience these association moments and don't have a cigarette, the easier it will be next time you encounter it.

So now cravings and anger.

Oh my god. The stress and anger when quitting. In those first 72 hours, I wanted to kill a guy for driving round the wrong way into a McDonalds car park. It wasn't even the action of driving the wrong way... it was the smug look on his face when I signaled to him that he was going the wrong way, and he gestured as if to say, "Meh, I don't really care...". It's lucky my car windows didn't work or I'd have shouted so much abuse at the guy over something so trivial (he wasn't even in my way).

The thing about the stress and anger of smoking, is that having a smoke becomes your 'go to' when you're stressed about something and there's a huge concern that when you quit, you will not have this method of release. Sure, that is true while your addicted to nicotine but actually, once you've broken it, you find that you get less stressed at things and more importantly, you get stressed for less time. What happens when you're a smoker, is you get mad about something and you stay mad at it until you've had a smoke. When you're a non-smoker, you get mad about something and then you get over it much faster (probably about the same time as it takes a smoker to grab their lighter and light up). The difference is if a smoker doesn't have a smoke... they will stay mad about it until they do.

As for the cravings. They get much easier over time, but it isn't as quick as you might like.

When I quit, I wanted to smoke every hour.... in fact every 30 minutes! It was sooooooo hard! Especially in those first 72 hours, but honestly, just assume those first 72 hours will be absolute hell and that you will constantly want to smoke, kill everyone you meet and generally hate the world.

So what about afterwards? Well here's the time scales I'd say I got really strong cravings (the kind you actually had to fight against).

First 72 hours: Constantly. Be a warrior.

After the first week: Randomly 10 times a day (plus one for every regular association).

Weeks 2 - 4: Maybe 4 or 5 a day (plus a mild one for every regular association).

After the first month: Around 2 a day, but most regular associations at this point has been broken).

After 3 months: A couple every week.

After 6 months: Maybe once a week.

After a year: Maybe once a month.

After a year and a half: Hmmm I can't remember my last one. I think I just had a thought of "Oh, it would be nice to enjoy a smoke right now!" but that was about it.


The key is that if you have some nicotine, you're probably going back to step one. If you're lucky you might only go back a few steps but it's not worth the risk. Quitting smoking is so fucking hard that you wouldn't want to move backwards and put yourself through that previous step ever again. That's my motivation for not even trying it again. I'm curious to see how my body would react if I had one... but what if it resets me back to step 1? All that hard work gone. Fuck that.


Treat it like a game. You have a 72 hour grind ahead of you. It's going to suck so much, but it's a challenge. Thrive on it. Once you get through those 72 hours, you will be in a much better place to decide if you can continue.. but you won't want to go back.
32
#32
11 Frags +

(hit char limit).

This is what worked for me. The science might not be entirely accurate, but I don't want anyone to correct me, because it worked and that's all that is important.

Good luck with your quit attempt. It's hard, but honestly, try to laugh at what your body is going through as it is so ridiculous that it's kind of funny. You're just craving a chemical and it can make you feel that shit about everything. It's hilarious.

Also, someone linked to Alan Carr's book.
http://web-profile.com.ua/wp-content/uploads/allen-carrs-easy-way-to-stop-smoking.pdf

I only scanned through it after I'd quit smoking at yes... it's a very good resource to use.

(hit char limit).

This is what worked for me. The science might not be entirely accurate, but I don't want anyone to correct me, because it worked and that's all that is important.

Good luck with your quit attempt. It's hard, but honestly, try to laugh at what your body is going through as it is so ridiculous that it's kind of funny. You're just craving a chemical and it can make you feel that shit about everything. It's hilarious.

Also, someone linked to Alan Carr's book.
http://web-profile.com.ua/wp-content/uploads/allen-carrs-easy-way-to-stop-smoking.pdf

I only scanned through it after I'd quit smoking at yes... it's a very good resource to use.
33
#33
0 Frags +

do sports or lift

do sports or lift
34
#34
2 Frags +

I quit by switching over to snus.

I quit by switching over to snus.
35
#35
4 Frags +

Thank you all for the advice. I really do appreciate it, as you're ultimately helping me save my life. I will do my best and this habit will be beaten. Thank you again!

Thank you all for the advice. I really do appreciate it, as you're ultimately helping me save my life. I will do my best and this habit will be beaten. Thank you again!
36
#36
-12 Frags +
kirbyShould we just convert this forum into an anti-bitch forum

yeah so you wont bitch about your fucking problems thats exactly what i want!

[quote=kirby]Should we just convert this forum into an anti-bitch forum[/quote]
yeah so you wont bitch about your fucking problems thats exactly what i want!
37
#37
2 Frags +
Saltysally1kirbyShould we just convert this forum into an anti-bitch forumyeah so you wont bitch about your fucking problems thats exactly what i want!

I don't know how you've done it but you're like a retarded version of mason. It's off-topic and everyone here is helping out with Kirby's problem. If you don't have anything beneficial to say then shut the fuck up and stop shitposting. At least mason has 1 meaningful post every once in a while, you're a waste of human matter.
Gl with solving your addiction Kirby, when I stayed in Syria everybody smoked, and I know the shit they've gone through just trying to quit, hope you are successful in quitting yo!

[quote=Saltysally1][quote=kirby]Should we just convert this forum into an anti-bitch forum[/quote]
yeah so you wont bitch about your fucking problems thats exactly what i want![/quote]
I don't know how you've done it but you're like a retarded version of mason. It's off-topic and everyone here is helping out with Kirby's problem. If you don't have anything beneficial to say then shut the fuck up and stop shitposting. At least mason has 1 meaningful post every once in a while, you're a waste of human matter.
Gl with solving your addiction Kirby, when I stayed in Syria everybody smoked, and I know the shit they've gone through just trying to quit, hope you are successful in quitting yo!
38
#38
6 Frags +

Got kids and stopped smoking from one day to the other, which is pretty lucky in my eyes. Now to manage my anger I just rage at euro trashcans in doublemixes. Maybe I should invite you

Got kids and stopped smoking from one day to the other, which is pretty lucky in my eyes. Now to manage my anger I just rage at euro trashcans in doublemixes. Maybe I should invite you
39
#39
-1 Frags +
Saltysally1kirbyShould we just convert this forum into an anti-bitch forumyeah so you wont bitch about your fucking problems thats exactly what i want!

fuck off already you dumb plebeian

[quote=Saltysally1][quote=kirby]Should we just convert this forum into an anti-bitch forum[/quote]
yeah so you wont bitch about your fucking problems thats exactly what i want![/quote]

fuck off already you dumb plebeian
40
#40
-3 Frags +
FenryrI don't know how you've done it but you're like a retarded version of mason. It's off-topic and everyone here is helping out with Kirby's problem. If you don't have anything beneficial to say then shut the fuck up and stop shitposting. At least mason has 1 meaningful post every once in a while, you're a waste of human matter.

http://i.imgur.com/DpaTzTG.gif

ok whatever at least u didnt capitalize my name

[quote=Fenryr]
I don't know how you've done it but you're like a retarded version of mason. It's off-topic and everyone here is helping out with Kirby's problem. If you don't have anything beneficial to say then shut the fuck up and stop shitposting. At least mason has 1 meaningful post every once in a while, you're a waste of human matter.
[/quote]

[IMG]http://i.imgur.com/DpaTzTG.gif[/IMG]
ok whatever at least u didnt capitalize my name
41
#41
1 Frags +

helps if you have a goal or reason for not smoking that will keep you motivated

if you just have a vague sense of "this is bad for me so i shouldn't do it" it will be tough cause cravings are a stronger, more immediate motivation

you'll be more successful if you have an objective like "I want to run a 5k 3 months from now"

has to be something you actually want to do though or it won't motivate you, so basically I'd suggest you spend some time thinking through things you've always kinda wanted to do that smoking holds you back from, and then come up with a goal with a specific timeframe and start working towards it. whether its playin a sport, getting those teeth whitened up, finally makin a move on some girl who's not into smokers w/e Just something specific, and set a time on when you want to accomplish it by (a realistic time).

when you have to fight cravings or you're feeling irritable you can view it as putting effort towards something tangible that you actually care about

this works for a lot of things btw, found it was the same thing with diet - much easier to stick to weight loss when you set a goal of losing X pounds in Y months because there's an event coming up you want to look good for etc

helps if you have a goal or reason for not smoking that will keep you motivated

if you just have a vague sense of "this is bad for me so i shouldn't do it" it will be tough cause cravings are a stronger, more immediate motivation

you'll be more successful if you have an objective like "I want to run a 5k 3 months from now"

has to be something you actually want to do though or it won't motivate you, so basically I'd suggest you spend some time thinking through things you've always kinda wanted to do that smoking holds you back from, and then come up with a goal with a specific timeframe and start working towards it. whether its playin a sport, getting those teeth whitened up, finally makin a move on some girl who's not into smokers w/e Just something specific, and set a time on when you want to accomplish it by (a realistic time).

when you have to fight cravings or you're feeling irritable you can view it as putting effort towards something tangible that you actually care about

this works for a lot of things btw, found it was the same thing with diet - much easier to stick to weight loss when you set a goal of losing X pounds in Y months because there's an event coming up you want to look good for etc
42
#42
2 Frags +

people suggesting alternatives for something unhealthly with an alternative that is nearly as unhealthy, don't get an e-cig

people suggesting alternatives for something unhealthly with an alternative that is nearly as unhealthy, don't get an e-cig
43
#43
2 Frags +

I know people that quit because they woke up one night not being able to breath fully anymore. I guess it's hard just doing it out of your mind without your body giving you any bad feelings about still doing it. This whole thing is a huge mindgame but whatever you do to replace smoking it shouldn't be something unhealthy because you don't want to put 2 bad things into your body in a short time.

I know people that quit because they woke up one night not being able to breath fully anymore. I guess it's hard just doing it out of your mind without your body giving you any bad feelings about still doing it. This whole thing is a huge mindgame but whatever you do to replace smoking it shouldn't be something unhealthy because you don't want to put 2 bad things into your body in a short time.
44
#44
0 Frags +
KidIpzGot kids and stopped smoking from one day to the other, which is pretty lucky in my eyes. Now to manage my anger I just rage at euro trashcans in doublemixes. Maybe I should invite you

Can confirm the rage.

[quote=KidIpz]Got kids and stopped smoking from one day to the other, which is pretty lucky in my eyes. Now to manage my anger I just rage at euro trashcans in doublemixes. Maybe I should invite you[/quote]

Can confirm the rage.
45
#45
0 Frags +

I wish more people would try to stop smoking.

I used to smoke but I just stopped although I was very young, nothing stressful was going through my life so I guess that's why It was easy.

Fzero pointed this out.. 'If possible, avoid stress. If you are able, take vacation time for the first hump' < This seems like the best possible thing you can do to help you go through with it.

I wish more people would try to stop smoking.

I used to smoke but I just stopped although I was very young, nothing stressful was going through my life so I guess that's why It was easy.

Fzero pointed this out.. 'If possible, avoid stress. If you are able, take vacation time for the first hump' < This seems like the best possible thing you can do to help you go through with it.
46
#46
-2 Frags +

What is the appeal of smoking?

What is the appeal of smoking?
47
#47
0 Frags +

it feel;s good probably

it feel;s good probably
48
#48
0 Frags +
shocka1What is the appeal of smoking?

it helps people with stress too

[quote=shocka1]What is the appeal of smoking?[/quote]
it helps people with stress too
49
#49
0 Frags +
shocka1What is the appeal of smoking?

I really enjoy smoking socially in the same way that people "drink alcohol socially", in that I don't regularly smoke on my own at all - but having a pack of cigarettes + a lighter ready during class breaks or work breaks has opened up tons of icebreakers and conversations with people that I wouldn't otherwise interact with

plus also nicotine feels good and blowing smoke is sexy

[quote=shocka1]What is the appeal of smoking?[/quote]
I really enjoy smoking socially in the same way that people "drink alcohol socially", in that I don't regularly smoke on my own at all - but having a pack of cigarettes + a lighter ready during class breaks or work breaks has opened up tons of icebreakers and conversations with people that I wouldn't otherwise interact with

plus also nicotine feels good and blowing smoke is sexy
50
#50
0 Frags +

This is fucking nuts.

This is fucking nuts.
51
#51
0 Frags +
glissI really enjoy smoking socially in the same way that people "drink alcohol socially", in that I don't regularly smoke on my own at all - but having a pack of cigarettes + a lighter ready during class breaks or work breaks has opened up tons of icebreakers and conversations with people that I wouldn't otherwise interact with

plus also nicotine feels good and blowing smoke is sexy

Do these "appeals" outweigh the health risks?

I'd assume it works both ways. The people who don't smoke, may stay inside the classroom or walk outside for a breathe of fresh air (away from the smokers). Sure, it is harder to "spark" conversations with those people because you don't have the common factor of smoking in your favor, but it can be just as rewarding.

Another detriment may be, non-smokers are "turned off" by smokers. It isn't usually the other way around. Smokers aren't necessarily "turned off" by non-smokers. People are very prejudice, and associate smoking with a whole lot of baggage.

One of my best friends is a smoker, and I do not let him smoke around me. He respects that, which I appreciate it.

[quote=gliss]I really enjoy smoking socially in the same way that people "drink alcohol socially", in that I don't regularly smoke on my own at all - but having a pack of cigarettes + a lighter ready during class breaks or work breaks has opened up tons of icebreakers and conversations with people that I wouldn't otherwise interact with

plus also nicotine feels good and blowing smoke is sexy[/quote]

Do these "appeals" outweigh the health risks?

I'd assume it works both ways. The people who don't smoke, may stay inside the classroom or walk outside for a breathe of fresh air (away from the smokers). Sure, it is harder to "spark" conversations with those people because you don't have the common factor of smoking in your favor, but it can be just as rewarding.

Another detriment may be, non-smokers are "turned off" by smokers. It isn't usually the other way around. Smokers aren't necessarily "turned off" by non-smokers. People are very prejudice, and associate smoking with a whole lot of baggage.

One of my best friends is a smoker, and I do not let him smoke around me. He respects that, which I appreciate it.
52
#52
0 Frags +

Smoked for a few years and like many, I tried quitting more then once.

The thing that pissed me off personally, would be cutting the smokes to a few per day. It might work for some people, but personally it just made me nervous and made me count my cigarettes per day. I mean, if you are smoking, fucking enjoy it, don't count "urrm this is my 3rd one today, I told myself I won't smoke more then 5, so that means I'll take one at 17 and another before bed". Fuck that shit.

The only direct consequence of that way of "quitting", would be me buying 2 packs (instead of the usual one) in a day, because I was so tensed out for not smoking past few days.

If you are going to quit - quit. Don't smoke weed, don't smoke a cigarette a day, don't smoke menthols, don't smoke electric ones, don't smoke anything. Just quit.

What also helped me immensely, was eating. Grab some Oreos or some similar cookies, and just take a few bites when you would usually smoke a cigarette. Sure, you'll gain a small amount of weight, but it's worth it. Your body and your wallet will be quite happy.

GL

Smoked for a few years and like many, I tried quitting more then once.

The thing that pissed me off personally, would be cutting the smokes to a few per day. It might work for some people, but personally it just made me nervous and made me count my cigarettes per day. I mean, if you are smoking, fucking enjoy it, don't count "urrm this is my 3rd one today, I told myself I won't smoke more then 5, so that means I'll take one at 17 and another before bed". Fuck that shit.

The only direct consequence of that way of "quitting", would be me buying 2 packs (instead of the usual one) in a day, because I was so tensed out for not smoking past few days.

If you are going to quit - quit. Don't smoke weed, don't smoke a cigarette a day, don't smoke menthols, don't smoke electric ones, don't smoke anything. Just quit.

What also helped me immensely, was eating. Grab some Oreos or some similar cookies, and just take a few bites when you would usually smoke a cigarette. Sure, you'll gain a small amount of weight, but it's worth it. Your body and your wallet will be quite happy.

GL
53
#53
1 Frags +

I'll be okay with eating more than usual. I need to gain weight anyway.

I'll be okay with eating more than usual. I need to gain weight anyway.
54
#54
1 Frags +

Whatever you do, just dont' smoke a few cigs per day. Either smoke or don't. Eat as much as you want, you can lose it easier than you can lose the crap on your lungs.

Whatever you do, just dont' smoke a few cigs per day. Either smoke or don't. Eat as much as you want, you can lose it easier than you can lose the crap on your lungs.
55
#55
0 Frags +

Feel free to give updates, Kirby. I'm interested and I'm sure others are as well. Good luck!

Feel free to give updates, Kirby. I'm interested and I'm sure others are as well. Good luck!
56
#56
3 Frags +

I decided to make today my day 1. I was more comfortable with setting a day to start. I don't know why, but it's been about an hour now, I think. I'm already craving. MVM is keeping me occupied though.

I decided to make today my day 1. I was more comfortable with setting a day to start. I don't know why, but it's been about an hour now, I think. I'm already craving. MVM is keeping me occupied though.
57
#57
0 Frags +

Not a smoker.

But a lot of my friends have been using those vapour juice things. Cheaper in the long run, tastes better and they claim they don't cough a pile of shit every morning. A lot of them would rather not have a cigarette if they don't have their vap because it tastes so bad.

Not a smoker.

But a lot of my friends have been using those vapour juice things. Cheaper in the long run, tastes better and they claim they don't cough a pile of shit every morning. A lot of them would rather not have a cigarette if they don't have their vap because it tastes so bad.
58
#58
0 Frags +
shocka1What is the appeal of smoking?

Relives stress, tobacco in general helps stave off drowsiness/heightens my reflexes. Dipping tobacco is a disgusting habit, but there's a reason it's so common with baseball players and I tend to play better TF2 when dipping (not at all a good reason though). I've also met a ton of people who asked me for a light on the street, and some of them stayed in my life. Got my current job on a smoke break, and I've met some pretty high powered politicians/lobbyists/businessmen smoking in the right places.

It obviously doesn't outweigh the health costs of lifetime smoking, but you're not doing a rational analysis when you light up, the same way you don't weight the pros and cons of alcoholism before knocking back a few beers.

Good for you Kirby, I'm quitting tomorrow too so I'd love to hear updates. Keep it up.

[quote=shocka1]What is the appeal of smoking?[/quote]
Relives stress, tobacco in general helps stave off drowsiness/heightens my reflexes. Dipping tobacco is a disgusting habit, but there's a reason it's so common with baseball players and I tend to play better TF2 when dipping (not at all a good reason though). I've also met a ton of people who asked me for a light on the street, and some of them stayed in my life. Got my current job on a smoke break, and I've met some pretty high powered politicians/lobbyists/businessmen smoking in the right places.

It obviously doesn't outweigh the health costs of lifetime smoking, but you're not doing a rational analysis when you light up, the same way you don't weight the pros and cons of alcoholism before knocking back a few beers.

Good for you Kirby, I'm quitting tomorrow too so I'd love to hear updates. Keep it up.
59
#59
1 Frags +

those dont smoke commercials are scary as fuck come on admit it

Show Content

On a serious note, I haven't ever smoked but I have seen the effects of it - I thought my neighbor whas around 60 yrs old when in reality she was 45. It has drastic physical effects from what i've seen from long-term use. I plan to stay away from it.

those dont smoke commercials are scary as fuck come on admit it

[spoiler][img]https://i.ytimg.com/vi/EyVLKHEqTu0/hqdefault.jpg[/img]
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On a serious note, I haven't ever smoked but I have seen the effects of it - I thought my neighbor whas around 60 yrs old when in reality she was 45. It has drastic physical effects from what i've seen from long-term use. I plan to stay away from it.
60
#60
3 Frags +

I keep having random moments where I'll forget I'm quitting and look for a pack of cigarettes, resulting in me being confused and stupefied. This is only a couple hours in. help me based god my brain is on some other shit

I keep having random moments where I'll forget I'm quitting and look for a pack of cigarettes, resulting in me being confused and stupefied. This is only a couple hours in. help me based god my brain is on some other shit
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