Upvote Upvoted 8 Downvote Downvoted
Overclocking Mice
posted in Hardware
1
#1
0 Frags +

Overclockers have found ways to overclock mice to 2000+ hz.

http://www.overclock.net/t/1589644/usb-mouse-hard-overclocking-2000-hz

Just saw this posted on Blur Busters. Haven't tried this out yet myself, but I thought some people here might be interested in trying this out.

Overclockers have found ways to overclock mice to 2000+ hz.

http://www.overclock.net/t/1589644/usb-mouse-hard-overclocking-2000-hz

Just saw this posted on Blur Busters. Haven't tried this out yet myself, but I thought some people here might be interested in trying this out.
2
#2
1 Frags +

requires a test mode driver to work

requires a test mode driver to work
3
#3
5 Frags +

What would this do?

What would this do?
4
#4
15 Frags +

Overclocking a mouse usually overclocks the mouse. You do this to get an overclocked mouse.

Overclocking a mouse usually overclocks the mouse. You do this to get an overclocked mouse.
5
#5
3 Frags +
SetsulOverclocking a mouse usually overclocks the mouse. You do this to get an overclocked mouse.

Obviously, im asking what it would improve?

[quote=Setsul]Overclocking a mouse usually overclocks the mouse. You do this to get an overclocked mouse.[/quote]

Obviously, im asking what it would improve?
6
#6
1 Frags +

Well I gave it a try using my m45, got it up to 3000hz "stable", The only thing I notice so far is that it feels much "smoother" and responsive in desktop mode(as in when I am in desktop and doing nothing but regular stuff, don't know if it's due to my monitor being 144hz one). I saw no difference in games between 1000hz and 3000hz...

Well I gave it a try using my m45, got it up to 3000hz "stable", The only thing I notice so far is that it feels much "smoother" and responsive in desktop mode(as in when I am in desktop and doing nothing but regular stuff, don't know if it's due to my monitor being 144hz one). I saw no difference in games between 1000hz and 3000hz...
7
#7
2 Frags +
DamnEasyWhat would this do?Marginally less input lag for one thing: On single events like clicking a mouse button USB polling adds latency up to a full poll interval, i. e. up to 1ms at 1kHz, but only 0.25ms at 4kHz; on average 750 / 2 = 375us faster input. Again, marginal.

Additionally a continuous flow of data as you get with standard mouse surface tracking will appear smoother; an update each 250us as opposed to each 1000us means your cursor travel/game rotation is less jumpy. You could also argue a greater polling rate more accurately reproduces the physical tracking path as lower polling introduces a kind of path correction (see Polling Misnomer: http://www.overclock.net/t/1251156/an-overview-of-mouse-technology) as per digital sample rate logic. But as opposed to audio or whatever in mousing the reproduction accuracy for "inbetweens" in constant motion is largely irrelevant; you only really care where you end up at and that's the same for all poll rates. Maybe when you are drawing stuff the visually corrective effect could be annoying, but there you can simply move your mouse more slowly to circumvent this effect. Plus, 1kHz is already "path-accurate" enough anyways - at least I don't think artists are maneuvering their hands consciously on a 1ms-scale.

On the flipside, swamping your CPU with 4k+ USB interrupts per second increases CPU load and decreases polling stability/precision (http://www.overclock.net/t/1550666/usb-polling-precision). Which basically means mouse stutter, noticeable in games primarily.

1kHz is plenty and we don't really need more. This is just interesting fun and play. Near-instantaneous isochronous communication between host and mouse could still be worthwhile in the future, but for that we'd need a dedicated real-time interface with CPU-independent input processing and mice that internally support sending out their data at rates far beyond the USB standard (i. e. after each individual frame correlation step, which is 6000-12000 times per second?).
[quote=DamnEasy]What would this do?[/quote]


[quote]Marginally less input lag for one thing: On single events like clicking a mouse button USB polling adds latency up to a full poll interval, i. e. up to 1ms at 1kHz, but only 0.25ms at 4kHz; on average 750 / 2 = 375us faster input. Again, marginal.

Additionally a continuous flow of data as you get with standard mouse surface tracking will appear smoother; an update each 250us as opposed to each 1000us means your cursor travel/game rotation is less jumpy. You could also argue a greater polling rate more accurately reproduces the physical tracking path as lower polling introduces a kind of path correction (see Polling Misnomer: http://www.overclock.net/t/1251156/an-overview-of-mouse-technology) as per digital sample rate logic. But as opposed to audio or whatever in mousing the reproduction accuracy for "inbetweens" in constant motion is largely irrelevant; you only really care where you end up at and that's the same for all poll rates. Maybe when you are drawing stuff the visually corrective effect could be annoying, but there you can simply move your mouse more slowly to circumvent this effect. Plus, 1kHz is already "path-accurate" enough anyways - at least I don't think artists are maneuvering their hands consciously on a 1ms-scale.

On the flipside, swamping your CPU with 4k+ USB interrupts per second increases CPU load and decreases polling stability/precision (http://www.overclock.net/t/1550666/usb-polling-precision). Which basically means mouse stutter, noticeable in games primarily.

1kHz is plenty and we don't really need more. This is just interesting fun and play. Near-instantaneous isochronous communication between host and mouse could still be worthwhile in the future, but for that we'd need a dedicated real-time interface with CPU-independent input processing and mice that internally support sending out their data at rates far beyond the USB standard (i. e. after each individual frame correlation step, which is 6000-12000 times per second?).[/quote]
8
#8
3 Frags +

EDIT: #7 ninja'd me

#5
Were you leaning on F5?

Anyway what you get (if your mouse even suppports >1000Hz) is higher CPU load and therefore lower polling precision. Oh wait you were asking for what this improves. Uhm, the number is higher?

EDIT: #7 ninja'd me

#5
Were you leaning on F5?

Anyway what you get (if your mouse even suppports >1000Hz) is higher CPU load and therefore lower polling precision. Oh wait you were asking for what this improves. Uhm, the number is higher?
9
#9
2 Frags +

I'm wondering whether this will allow people with older mice such as myself (IME 3) to be able to get 1000Hz on the new Skylake processors. (Because currently the only way is to buy the fatality mobo)

I'm wondering whether this will allow people with older mice such as myself (IME 3) to be able to get 1000Hz on the new Skylake processors. (Because currently the only way is to buy the fatality mobo)
10
#10
0 Frags +

Can this break the mouse?

Can this break the mouse?
11
#11
0 Frags +
joshuawnrequires a test mode driver to work

To reiterate for any north americans, ESEA doesn't support test mode drivers. Do not do this on match night if you are looking to try it out. (just incase you have a hard time reverting it)

[quote=joshuawn]requires a test mode driver to work[/quote]

To reiterate for any north americans, ESEA doesn't support test mode drivers. Do not do this on match night if you are looking to try it out. (just incase you have a hard time reverting it)
12
#12
2 Frags +

holy crap 2000 Hz is already pretty overkill.
im gonna stay at 500 Hz since anything more makes my low end mouse sensor pretty crazy+

DamnEasyWhat would this do?

overclocking the USB polling rate decreases the negative acceleration of the mouse! heres a good video to explain what negative acceleration is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgbWWTanmQk
its kinda like the top speed at wich your mouse sensor detects movement. so maybe with 125 Hz you can 360 in 20cm swowly but moving the mouse fast causes you to turn less
That said having polling rate too high above default settings can cause jitter or other problems !

SetsulAnyway what you get (if your mouse even suppports >1000Hz) is higher CPU load and therefore lower polling precision. Oh wait you were asking for what this improves. Uhm, the number is higher?

getting mouse input more often. and yeah this could affect cpu performance with very old CPUs
not a big deal at all this days... 1000hz means you're making the system check the mouse EVERY 1ms!
most cheap mice are 125 Hz by default, a default that was set a looong time ago.

holy crap 2000 Hz is already pretty overkill.
im gonna stay at 500 Hz since anything more makes my low end mouse sensor pretty crazy+
[quote=DamnEasy]What would this do?[/quote]
overclocking the USB polling rate decreases the negative acceleration of the mouse! heres a good video to explain what negative acceleration is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgbWWTanmQk
its kinda like the top speed at wich your mouse sensor detects movement. so maybe with 125 Hz you can 360 in 20cm swowly but moving the mouse fast causes you to turn less
That said having polling rate too high above default settings can cause jitter or other problems !
[quote=Setsul]
Anyway what you get (if your mouse even suppports >1000Hz) is higher CPU load and therefore lower polling precision. Oh wait you were asking for what this improves. Uhm, the number is higher?[/quote]
getting mouse input more often. and yeah this could affect cpu performance with very old CPUs
not a big deal at all this days... 1000hz means you're making the system check the mouse EVERY 1ms!
most cheap mice are 125 Hz by default, a default that was set a looong time ago.
13
#13
2 Frags +

i've been using a $5 mouse for the past two years, which by default can't go above 125 Hz, and the sensor would just go nuts at semi-fast movement speeds or not register it at all, so i had to overclock it to 1000 Hz (using a pretty old tutorial that requires test mode), and have not had any problems since

i've been using a $5 mouse for the past two years, which by default can't go above 125 Hz, and the sensor would just go nuts at semi-fast movement speeds or not register it at all, so i had to overclock it to 1000 Hz (using a pretty old tutorial that requires test mode), and have not had any problems since
14
#14
1 Frags +

Can I overclock my keyboard?

Can I overclock my keyboard?
15
#15
2 Frags +

#12
This isn't about performance, TF2 won't suffer from that, rather the mouse will suffer because of TF2.
Your CPU can handle doing this once per millisecond without any problems, but it won't be after exactly a millisecond. Sometimes it'll be 0.9ms, sometimes 1.1ms. This gets worse with higher load (higher polling rate). Here's some pictures.

At 125Hz

http://i.imgur.com/saTBBzh.png

The worst outliers are less than +-0.07ms

At 1000Hz

http://i.imgur.com/xtQFNBO.png

Ignoring the absolute worst at +-0.3ms we're talking about double at +-0.14ms.

Now take a guess what happens at 2000Hz or even 4000Hz. Let it sink in a bit. Updates every 0.25ms plus minus 0.3ms. Yeah, sounds great, right? Now think about what happens when there's actual load on the CPU, you know something that absolutely loves using the CPU. Does anything come to mind? I heard there's a game called TF2 ...

#12
This isn't about performance, TF2 won't suffer from that, rather the mouse will suffer because of TF2.
Your CPU can handle doing this once per millisecond without any problems, but it won't be after exactly a millisecond. Sometimes it'll be 0.9ms, sometimes 1.1ms. This gets worse with higher load (higher polling rate). Here's some pictures.

At 125Hz
[img]http://i.imgur.com/saTBBzh.png[/img]
The worst outliers are less than +-0.07ms

At 1000Hz
[img]http://i.imgur.com/xtQFNBO.png[/img]
Ignoring the absolute worst at +-0.3ms we're talking about double at +-0.14ms.

Now take a guess what happens at 2000Hz or even 4000Hz. Let it sink in a bit. Updates every 0.25ms plus minus 0.3ms. Yeah, sounds great, right? Now think about what happens when there's actual load on the CPU, you know something that absolutely loves using the CPU. Does anything come to mind? I heard there's a game called TF2 ...
16
#16
0 Frags +

what kind of, if any, damage would this cause to your computer or mouse?

i'm not educated in this topic at all so correct me if i'm wrong, but wouldn't you not benefit at all unless you get more than 1000 fps?

what kind of, if any, damage would this cause to your computer or mouse?

i'm not educated in this topic at all so correct me if i'm wrong, but wouldn't you not benefit at all unless you get more than 1000 fps?
17
#17
0 Frags +
Setsul#12
This isn't about performance, TF2 won't suffer from that, rather the mouse will suffer because of TF2.
Your CPU can handle doing this once per millisecond without any problems, but it won't be after exactly a millisecond. Sometimes it'll be 0.9ms, sometimes 1.1ms. This gets worse with higher load (higher polling rate). Here's some pictures.

At 125Hz
http://i.imgur.com/saTBBzh.png
The worst outliers are less than +-0.07ms

At 1000Hz
http://i.imgur.com/xtQFNBO.png
Ignoring the absolute worst at +-0.3ms we're talking about double at +-0.14ms.

Now take a guess what happens at 2000Hz or even 4000Hz. Let it sink in a bit. Updates every 0.25ms plus minus 0.3ms. Yeah, sounds great, right? Now think about what happens when there's actual load on the CPU, you know something that absolutely loves using the CPU. Does anything come to mind? I heard there's a game called TF2 ...

I heard that game was a myth

[quote=Setsul]#12
This isn't about performance, TF2 won't suffer from that, rather the mouse will suffer because of TF2.
Your CPU can handle doing this once per millisecond without any problems, but it won't be after exactly a millisecond. Sometimes it'll be 0.9ms, sometimes 1.1ms. This gets worse with higher load (higher polling rate). Here's some pictures.

At 125Hz
[img]http://i.imgur.com/saTBBzh.png[/img]
The worst outliers are less than +-0.07ms

At 1000Hz
[img]http://i.imgur.com/xtQFNBO.png[/img]
Ignoring the absolute worst at +-0.3ms we're talking about double at +-0.14ms.

Now take a guess what happens at 2000Hz or even 4000Hz. Let it sink in a bit. Updates every 0.25ms plus minus 0.3ms. Yeah, sounds great, right? Now think about what happens when there's actual load on the CPU, you know something that absolutely loves using the CPU. Does anything come to mind? I heard there's a game called TF2 ...[/quote]

I heard that game was a myth
Please sign in through STEAM to post a comment.