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Combo Mentality
1
#1
0 Frags +

I was re-reading some of my history books these past 2 weeks and I came across 2 quotes from George S. Patton. If you have the time, he is am amazing figure to learn about.

I think these 2 quotes fit perfectly for TF2 and the Pocket / Combo in general. They both feel main caller related since he leads/directs the team but seem to warn about trying to micro everyone and just focusing on the main job.

"Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do, and they will surprise you with their ingenuity."

"...My flanks are something for the enemy to worry about, not me. Before he finds out where my flanks are, I'll be cutting the bastard's throat"

I was re-reading some of my history books these past 2 weeks and I came across 2 quotes from George S. Patton. If you have the time, he is am amazing figure to learn about.

I think these 2 quotes fit perfectly for TF2 and the Pocket / Combo in general. They both feel main caller related since he leads/directs the team but seem to warn about trying to micro everyone and just focusing on the main job.

"Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do, and they will surprise you with their ingenuity."

"...My flanks are something for the enemy to worry about, not me. Before he finds out where my flanks are, I'll be cutting the bastard's throat"
2
#2
14 Frags +

My FPS Strategy : http://classics.mit.edu/Tzu/artwar.html

My FPS Strategy : http://classics.mit.edu/Tzu/artwar.html
3
#3
22 Frags +

But if you don't control the flank you can never control the universe.

But if you don't control the flank you can never control the universe.
4
#4
8 Frags +
n3My FPS Strategy : http://classics.mit.edu/Tzu/artwar.html

Spy so important, maybe highlander is the superior game mode after all :)

[quote=n3]My FPS Strategy : http://classics.mit.edu/Tzu/artwar.html[/quote]

Spy so important, maybe highlander is the superior game mode after all :)
5
#5
9 Frags +

The first quote is definitely an effective way to lead. Everyone on a team has the capacity to bring their own flair and creativity and you should let that flourish instead of stifling it, you just need to give them a vision and a goal to work towards. You'll have a lot more success and your teammates will grow to truly respect you and each other.

The first quote is definitely an effective way to lead. Everyone on a team has the capacity to bring their own flair and creativity and you should let that flourish instead of stifling it, you just need to give them a vision and a goal to work towards. You'll have a lot more success and your teammates will grow to truly respect you and each other.
6
#6
15 Frags +

Some teams benefit from absolute control, but it is true that others thrive on being more flexible (particularly for teams with solid players top to bottom). You find absolute control being the most effective at the lower skill levels where you may have some folks who don't really understand what's going on - of course it breaks down if the leader also has no idea what he/she is doing.

The other quote about flanks is almost universal among tank generals in WW2 - the idea was that you would strike first to gain initiative and dictate when and where battles would occur as opposed to being forced to defend again and again, because it was thought that a combination of factors made static defense (which had reigned supreme since ~ the 1850s) untenable. There were also plenty of military thinkers who sought to completely forgo defense entirely, for example the Red Army's field manual prior to WW2 had just over 200 pages on how to execute various types of attack, whereas defensive tactics were reduced to a single chapter, because it was thought any kind of defense was admitting impending strategic defeat .

It's true in TF2 in so far as if you constantly force fights you don't often have to worry about your flank because you'll likely overpower your opposition as long as you can manage to clear the choke and don't encounter a hard wall like an uber - mix^ in the s10-14 era was particularly good at this (that's not to say other teams haven't also been effective with it too - they're just the easiest example) mihaly's flow was built around the concept for the most part. Of course, the counter to such a tactic is strategic depth ;) essentially passive play such that the attack can't succeed in breaking you or turning your own flanks, and as such gets enveloped and destroyed. G.S. Isserson, basically the architect of the Soviet army in ww2 (though he was in prison for the duration of the war) used the word "depth" in virtually every sentence to describe how he envisioned strategic movement lol. In fact for funzies he wrote a book in 1933 called "Deep Operation" which is still classified to this day.

Some teams benefit from absolute control, but it is true that others thrive on being more flexible (particularly for teams with solid players top to bottom). You find absolute control being the most effective at the lower skill levels where you may have some folks who don't really understand what's going on - of course it breaks down if the leader also has no idea what he/she is doing.

The other quote about flanks is almost universal among tank generals in WW2 - the idea was that you would strike first to gain initiative and dictate when and where battles would occur as opposed to being forced to defend again and again, because it was thought that a combination of factors made static defense (which had reigned supreme since ~ the 1850s) untenable. There were also plenty of military thinkers who sought to completely forgo defense entirely, for example the Red Army's field manual prior to WW2 had just over 200 pages on how to execute various types of attack, whereas defensive tactics were reduced to a single chapter, because it was thought any kind of defense was admitting impending strategic defeat .

It's true in TF2 in so far as if you constantly force fights you don't often have to worry about your flank because you'll likely overpower your opposition as long as you can manage to clear the choke and don't encounter a hard wall like an uber - mix^ in the s10-14 era was particularly good at this (that's not to say other teams haven't also been effective with it too - they're just the easiest example) mihaly's flow was built around the concept for the most part. Of course, the counter to such a tactic is strategic depth ;) essentially passive play such that the attack can't succeed in breaking you or turning your own flanks, and as such gets enveloped and destroyed. G.S. Isserson, basically the architect of the Soviet army in ww2 (though he was in prison for the duration of the war) used the word "depth" in virtually every sentence to describe how he envisioned strategic movement lol. In fact for funzies he wrote a book in 1933 called "Deep Operation" which is still classified to this day.
7
#7
7 Frags +

My team draws a lot of inspiration from the Qur'an as well as Gordon Brown's autobiography 'My Life, Our Times'.

My team draws a lot of inspiration from the Qur'an as well as Gordon Brown's autobiography 'My Life, Our Times'.
8
#8
-5 Frags +

i just watch b4nny's stream

i just watch b4nny's stream
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